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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greeetings! What size screen do you recommend to filter my honey? 200? 400? Any advice you can give me to avoid cloudy honey would be great!
 

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Have use 200, 400, and 600 which are often called fine, medium, and coarse. For me I have found that the 400 (medium) works best.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you groundhwg for your reply. I actually bought the double strainer honey sieve (that fits over the bucket) and the upper mesh is 1875 micron and the bottom is 650 micron - I guess i should put it through the 400 after these 2? Is anyone else using this double sieve and then filtering it again. I just don't want the honey to be cloudy. This is the item I have.

https://www.amazon.com/VIVO-Stainle...ocphy=1015254&hvtargid=pla-351285751621&psc=1
 

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Here is the slickest way to filter honey. Mannlakeltd.com 5 Gallon Pail Filter - Extra Fine
Product Code: HH-380

Push the bag down into the 5 gallon pail, roll the rim of the bag out and over the outside of the pail. Extract honey and wax into the bag and then slowly pull up or suspend the bag with bungy cord. You end up with a bag with the wax inside and a pail of filtered honey.

I have nightmares about trying to filter using the trays again.
 

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Here is the slickest way to filter honey. Mannlakeltd.com 5 Gallon Pail Filter - Extra Fine
Product Code: HH-380

Push the bag down into the 5 gallon pail, roll the rim of the bag out and over the outside of the pail. Extract honey and wax into the bag and then slowly pull up or suspend the bag with bungy cord. You end up with a bag with the wax inside and a pail of filtered honey.

I have nightmares about trying to filter using the trays again.
+10!!! I use similar and it makes a world of difference. Just be careful suspending the bag; it will make a mess when you miss the bucket. :) I wish they would post the actual mesh size instead of "extra fine".
 

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I haven't closely compared it with the range of tray filters marked 200 400 600 but it is plenty fine enough. I have made some up using their bulk filter material and it may be a tad coarser. I use it similarly in my rubbermaid uncapping tote. It gets hot wax dripped on it from uncapping so gets a bit shoddy looking. I have picked up some curtain sheer material that works fine for making them up if you have a honey with a sewing machine!
 

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I use a paint strainer bag from Lowe's. Looks just like the Mann lake one above. Could even be the same thing repackaged. I have no idea the mesh but it works fine.
 

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Thank you groundhwg for your reply. I actually bought the double strainer honey sieve (that fits over the bucket) and the upper mesh is 1875 micron and the bottom is 650 micron - I guess i should put it through the 400 after these 2? Is anyone else using this double sieve and then filtering it again. I just don't want the honey to be cloudy. This is the item I have.

https://www.amazon.com/VIVO-Stainle...ocphy=1015254&hvtargid=pla-351285751621&psc=1
I have used various filters. Double strainer is the best. Of the nylon bucket filters, I prefer 600 microns. I value pollen over clarity. Personal preference.
 

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I use a paint strainer bag from Lowe's. Looks just like the Mann lake one above. Could even be the same thing repackaged. I have no idea the mesh but it works fine.
I think you are correct. They are available at paint stores, Amazon, and probably home brewing supplies. Mesh designations vs the metric particle size designation makes for confusion. It appears the paint filters can be coarse or fine.
 

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Here is the slickest way to filter honey. Mannlakeltd.com 5 Gallon Pail Filter - Extra Fine
Product Code: HH-380

Push the bag down into the 5 gallon pail, roll the rim of the bag out and over the outside of the pail. Extract honey and wax into the bag and then slowly pull up or suspend the bag with bungy cord. You end up with a bag with the wax inside and a pail of filtered honey.

I have nightmares about trying to filter using the trays again.
I Bought a clarifying tank and an inline filter this year ( all used and cheap thankfully from an estate sale). Filtering the honey through the double sieve is a PITA because they clog. Same with the sit on the top bucket filters. This bag idea of yours would probably be easier though!
 

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Or, you could put a "grit guard wash bucket insert" (google it) in the bottom of your bucket and leave the gate open.
You do leave the gate wide open. I think what texanbelchers is referring to is that when pulling the bag slowly up that the suspension point is directly above the bucket. Depending on the stretch of the cord or the pulley and weight system, the bag of still drippy wax may be a foot above the rim of the pail.

I have several set up doing their thing while another is being extracted. The beauty is you dont have to stand and hold or babysit the straining or worry about overflowing or plugging.

Not even in the same league as the straining trays method!
 

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Thanks, We used to use cheesecloth in the old days but needed to skim the top few days later.
Yes, something like cheesecloth openings will take out the legs and wings but if you want to remove the eyelashes and pollen, you need finer! I have no problem with seeing a film of pollen and micro wax crystals on top of honey. Dad used to claim that for himself. Honey also used to be solid, not all runny. Now some people freak out at the so called scum on honey and crystallization is a sign it is going bad!

If you are processing for the boutique market nowadays the honey has to be fine filtered, settled and skimmed. My market in labeled mason jars from my front yard buys for the home grown appeal. My son moves most of his honey at farmers market and store resellers so requires fancier labels and compliance with rules and regulations.
 

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You do leave the gate wide open.
I do.

I think what texanbelchers is referring to is that when pulling the bag slowly up that the suspension point is directly above the bucket. Depending on the stretch of the cord or the pulley and weight system, the bag of still drippy wax may be a foot above the rim of the pail.

I see no reason to suspend the bag, the "grit guard" is already suspending the bag above the bottom.

I use this method to drain cappings.
I place a bag filled with cappings on the "grit guard insert", open the gate and leave them in my hot room to drain into another bucket for a few days.
 

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For some reason we are talking past each other. One may be that I have no visualization of what a TM "Grit guard is. In my system the filter bag is opened up inside of the empty pail and the mouth of it is rolled over the rim of the pail. I extract into the open filter bag in the pail or pour in a pail of unfiltered honey. Then I gather the neck of the bag as you would a grain bag, tie it off and attach a suspended bungy cord to it which slowly pulls the bag (and the wax particles) up through the honey. It leaves behind a pail of now filtered honey and the bag with the few pounds of wax is hanging just clear of the pail. It takes half an hour roughly. The only moving part is the bag; it pulls the wax out of the honey with just the gentle tug on the bag. No stacking.
 

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One may be that I have no visualization of what a TM "Grit guard is.
Which is why I wrote, google it.
A "grit guard" is a raised plastic grid that fits in the bottom of a 5 gallon bucket. It's designed for car washing... and works for filtering honey.

If you google "grit guard" and then go to google images, it will all make sense.
Or look for "grit guard" on youtube.
 
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