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I have ten beehives and I am starting to develop a severe allergy to stings so I have to sell them. They include a stand, screened bottom board, slatted rack, three med. brood chambers, two med. supers, inner cover, outer cover, hive-top feeders. The hives are extremely strong, survived the cold winter well, have swarmed so they all have young queens, lots of brood, and they have already stored a lot of honey. I was wondering what a typical fair price to ask might be for a strong hive? I am an engineer and do woodworking as a hobby and made all the woodware myself, so it is much higher quality than what you buy for a bee supply outlet. I am going to miss having bees. Thanks, Jim
 

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I would see an allergist as well. I understand the sensitivity can be gradually increased and getting someone to care for them while being treated may be an option.
If you sell them maybe get in touch with a bee club. If you were in my area I would pay $200.00 and I think that is a great deal. If I was selling, which I have no intention of doing, I'd sell for $350.00 but only If the hive equipment was less then 2 years old and in primo shape and they were double ten frame deeps full with bee and at least 18 frames drawn and holding resources.
 

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In my area Nashville Tn people get $250 for a ten frame deep hive complete. If I were you and had to sell I would split into ten frame hives add a queen to the half that needs it and sell them like that because someone who already has bees probably will not give as much as you can get from someone wanting bees and a newbee doesn't need to deal with a big strong hive anyway. Since you like to do wood work you can make the bottom and tops to complete the hives.
 

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in western Washington, on Craigslist, 10 frames, complete, $150-200. Two deep with bees, complete (bottom, inner cover, top, frames, etc) $200-260. Nuc from $110-150, depending on frames of bees,, and wood vs cardboard box. Cheapest I've seen is $200.00 for two deeps plus one medium (with bees, of course), from someone too old or ill to care for them. Some will move them for an additional fee, most will not. (I guess some urban/backyard types don't have a truck).
 

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The hives are worth $400 each at a minimum as they stand. That is for the basic hives. Drawn supers are worth $40 apiece. What fool wouldn't pay $4 for good light drawn comb? The screened bottom boards and slatted racks are an incentive to some but junk to others and woujld not play large. Start at $400 per hive. $40 for supers or more if full of honey.
 

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May not apply, but also on Craigslist, greater Seattle and north, two different guys who are done with raspberry pollination and don't want to move bees are selling double deeps at $220, singles $140, both for bees on ten frame equipment. $140 for a strong single seems like a good deal when nucs with three frames of brood are going for the same price, locally.
 

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I would say 200-250. You don't know what you are getting. Only a fool would pay 300+. Sorry if you paid 300 before.[/QUOTE

Then I would only sell to fools. (or people who try to order in the spring)
 

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I have ten beehives and I am starting to develop a severe allergy to stings so I have to sell them. They include a stand, screened bottom board, slatted rack, three med. brood chambers, two med. supers, inner cover, outer cover, hive-top feeders. The hives are extremely strong, survived the cold winter well, have swarmed so they all have young queens, lots of brood, and they have already stored a lot of honey. I was wondering what a typical fair price to ask might be for a strong hive? I am an engineer and do woodworking as a hobby and made all the woodware myself, so it is much higher quality than what you buy for a bee supply outlet. I am going to miss having bees. Thanks, Jim
If you are certain you want to sell them let me know. I live in Northern KY and would be interested in purchasing them.
 

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We normally get folks that show up in our bee club in the middle of July and want bees. They pay a premium for their bees. My cousin and I bought twelve hives worth of woodenware and four hives with bees in them for under $400. If you can keep them for a while longer you may come out OK, but if you are in a hurry you will lose your shirt.
 

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A very strong 10-frame deep goes for about $220 in my area this time of year. (Where "very strong" means all 10 frames are packed with bees.) However, I don't think that implies a hive consisting of two strong 10-frames deeps (which is the equivalent of three mediums) would go for $440. Fewer people have $440 to drop on beekeeping than have $220, and I think most people interested in beekeeping want to grow the hives themselves rather than pay "full price" for someone else's "turnkey" hives. So, maybe $300 -$350 if the hives are sold as described.

You would certainly get more overall if you broke the hives down into smaller but more units. Perhaps do walk-away splits, then sell the mother hives immediatly, and sell the daughter hives once they have requeened and show a good egg pattern.

Also,

"The hives are extremely strong, . . . have swarmed . . . ". These two are frequently mutually exclusive, meaning a hive that has just swarmed usually has a substantially reduced population, so you may consider re-evaluating their strength. Not saying there is anything wrong with the hives, just that "large population" and "freshly swarmed" typically don't go hand-in-hand. (unless I am misinterpreting what is meant by "extremely strong.") Result being that the strong 10-frame deep worth $220, above, will be worth less after it has swarmed. Keep in mind that "freshly swarmed" also means that the hive is now led by an unproven queen, which will have some negative affect on perceived value to some.

Additionally, the time of year they are sold matters, too. For example, when it is close to winter, the hives have less value because the buyer is immediatly taking on the risk of whether the hive will survive the winter. Mid-summer they may have more value because there will be new beeks who didn't get their orders in last year who are desperate for a hive or two.

JMHO
 

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I would say 200-250. You don't know what you are getting. Only a fool would pay 300+. Sorry if you paid 300 before.
Depends on were you live. There are plenty of Prius driving suburbanites in my neck of the woods that have more dollars than cents (fools).
 

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If you have bees, then paying for more bees has less value than making more. If you have no bees you can not make them.

So, if you have no bees and want them do you wait for another year?
Do you spend hours looking for the very best price?
Price of a hive compared to NBA playoff tickets?
Is an expensive hive with good bees foolish or are cheap bees foolish?

Fools is really not correct. Determined and able are more appropriate.
 

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As a country driving prius owner I can verify that due to gas prices I have more dollars in my pocket than my neighbors!
However, even with all that money in my pocket I wouldn't pay $400 for a hive.
 

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Hope this doesn't highjack the thread, but splitting them was mentioned....
So, which is better spent: two "five" frame nucs (3 frames brood, two honey/pollen, and a queen) for $110.00 each, or one (ten frame) double deep for $220.00 ? The double deep may make surplus honey this summer, the nucs very little chance of that, but one gets double the potential colonies.
 

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The more bees you have, the more frugal you become, at least that has been my observation. You learn how to make splits to get your own increases, and you become patient with your bees. I wouldn't sell a nuc for $110, around here they go for more, but I don't know that I could sell a deep or even double deep for $300, except maybe to a new beek. And you need to find ten of them. Splitting everything would probably bring the most money, but you need a market, and you need to do the splits. And in the end you have all the left over woodenware, which I guess you could let go cheap if you did ok on selling the bees.
 
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