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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All!

We want to set out some pollen producers with nectar producing plants. Are they the same? Is a nectar producer going to be as good a pollen producer? What kind of plants are pollen producers? I didn't see anything on a search. Thanks for your time! Take care!
David
 

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Hi David-

They're not the same. Some plants are primarily pollen producers, some produce pollen and nectar in varying amounts, and some are primarily nectar producers. Other flowers are totally ignored by bees. There seems to be no shortage of pollen in any case so I'm more interested in nectar producing plants, but they're both important.

You can tell which is which by watching the bees- if they're collecting pollen, you'll see it in their saddle bags. If they're collecting nectar, you won't. On plants that produce both, you'll see some bees collecting pollen and some collecting nectar. Also, many plants only produce nectar during certain times of the day or for a short period during their bloom so you'll see bees collecting say pollen in the morning and nectar in the afternoon. For example, around here white clover is only of interest to my bees in the afternoon. Somehow, they know...

Sometimes bees will collect both nectar and pollen on the same flight, but usually they're foraging for one or the other. Also, with some exceptions bees usually forage on ONE variety of plant on a flight rather than sampling a bunch of different flowers.

There are some plants/trees/shrubs that are sure-fire favorites, but your best bet is to note what grows wild in your area, when it blooms and for how long, and if the bees are foraging on it, then propogate that. This often involves nothing more than not mowing your lawn, or scattering weed seed in your neighbor's garden. Dandelion is a good example. I used to think it was a weed.. now I see it for what it really is: God's early spring Gift to honey bees.

My goal would be to provide forage during the natural dearth periods so the bees would have something to work between flows. For example, we've found that the bees absolutely love Veronica- it blooms for weeks on end in mid-summer and the bees collect nectar from it from dawn to dusk, day after day. It grows like a weed. They also like our Cat Mint- we'll be planting more of that.

There is a lot of information on the web- try googling for "nectar pollen honey" or something like that. Have fun.

George-
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
George and Michael!!
Thanks for the info. You got me to thinking in another direction.
I did find this in the University of Georgia website by Proffessor Keith DeLaplane (I know I botched the spelling, sorry sir) for the Southeast (I guess Arkansas is considered this at times). It covers nectar and pollen as well as time frames for a bee pasture. I don't know how to get a web link on here, so I apologize to all. Especially you Technocrats out there.
David
www.ent.uga.edu/bees/bee_pubs/conservation/bee_conservation.htm
  • University of Georgia Agriculture Department[/URL] is the website. I pulled the list from here I thought it was a bit much. If you want the whole list just PM me. If you want me to put it back up here let me know. Or copy the website and use it in your search (unless you're outdoorsunlimited then your hunt).
 
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