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I'm thinking ahead, and will be planting for 5 - 8 years out coming up next month.

Last fall I planted numerous varieties of apple, asian pear, and peach trees. Then, this spring I planted blueberry plants.

Now, I'm ready to get some nut bearing plants, and want to make sure that my bees can draw nectar from them. I hear that pecan trees are in short supply, but from what I gather pecans are wind pollinated.

What trees do bees like?
 

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Hazelnut trees, last year I planted 20 of them, 15 survived our winter, and doing fine.
Good source of early pollen and nectar.
 

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Second the hazelnut suggestion as a pollen producer. FWIW, we are quite a bit south of you, and pecans really struggle here.

The native walnut tree is listed as a good pollen source in "American Honey Plants" by Frank Pellet. The native Allegheny Chinkapin is listed as a nectar producer, but the honey is listed as being an inferior quality.

HTH,

Shane
 

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Do bees draw nectar from pecans?
No, there is no nectar from pecans. All nuts are wind pollinated with the exception of almonds, which are related to peaches, not true nut trees. Bees will collect pollen from all nuts trees IF they need it and nothing better (nutrition-wise) is available. Hazelnuts are the best in that they flower very early and the bees need that early Spring pollen. If any nectar is produced, it is so little it has no value to us or the bees.
 

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This is a question for your allergist, but it is my understanding that the protiens that cause the reaction from nuts themselves are quite different from the ones that are in the pollen. Therefore, they would cause a different type of reaction, if they cause a reaction at all. Nut tree pollen is quite common in the late Spring and is carried long distances from the trees by the wind. It's fair to say that if you go outside in the Spring you are breathing some type of nut tree pollen. Honey would contain even less than what is in the air in the Spring.
 
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