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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know this may be the dumbest question ever but, here goes. What makes a telescoping lid a telescoping lid. I have never seen a migratory lid in person but, looking at the picture the only difference I can see is the telescoping lid has wood pieces that go all the way around edge, where the migratory lid only has two pieces.
 

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Well here are my two cents worth. I built and use telescoping hive lids and they consist of five pieces, whereas the migratory lids consist of three pieces. To describe the migratory lid and its advantages, imagine a flat piece of plywood or similar, the same size of a hive box with about 3/4" over-hang each end. Two strips of wood on the front and the back, about 3/4" x 1 1/2" x the width of the hive are fastened with the small dimension to the plywood. This will keep the lid from sliding forward or backward. It will also give room to stack another hive directly against the first for transport on pallets in pollination operations. Now, imagine two more strips installed on the long sides so that it forms like a box that slides over or can be described as "telescoping" over the upper box or super. Hope this helps. Take care and have fun.
 

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A telescoping lid or cover is one that fits over the top of the inner cover and slides down a bit over the top box. It's basically a lid that has four sides. A migratory lid is basically a piece of wood that is essentially the same size as the inner cover. Since a migratory lid doesn't extend past the sides of the box, you can push hives tight up against each other for transporting.

Check out this link...it might explain it better:

http://basicbeekeeping.blogspot.com/2007/09/hive-components-lesson-four-inner-outer.html
 

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the telescoping lid has wood pieces that go all the way around edge, where the migratory lid only has two pieces.
There's your answer...



"Telescoping" seems a poor choice of words since there is no mechanical expansion/contraction as in:

"To cause to slide inward or outward in overlapping sections"

"Outer Cover" is the current term, and as you said, the edge framing overlaps the inner cover.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ok I got it now. I was thinking that was the difference but, was not sure. I thought maybe I was missing something. Thanks, Guys.
 

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I'm not sure if I'm repeating what's already been said but I always thought that it was because the sides of a telescoping cover extended (telescope) beyond the sides of the hive. Rainwater running off of a tcover will fall away from the hive bodies. With an mcover rainwater runs down the sides of the hive bodies. The advantage of a tcover is that less water enters the hive through cracks and crevices between hive boxes. The advantage to an mcover is that hives can be pushed right up against their neighbor...allowing more to be loaded onto a truck for .......well, migration.
 

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Beecurious - with all respect - think of a "pirates telescope", made out of progressively larger sizes of brass tube. The roof is the "overlapping section" to the super. I believe some of the earlier bee hives where constructed with tapered sides, so that even the super to super joints where protected. I will have to re-examine the picture of my Great-Grandfather in his bee yard from 1920's.

Roland
 
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