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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This brood comb came from a removal I did yesterday. Can someone help me identify it? I don't think it's AFB because of the consistency of the fluid in the cell. It's a brown watery liquid instead of ropy like AFB would be. This hive was apparently sprayed with pesticide sometime in the recent past, but I don't think that would cause this.

TIA

Purple Pattern Design Organism Metal Bee Honeycomb Insect Brown Membrane-winged insect Bee Honeycomb Honeybee Membrane-winged insect Design
 

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I'm sure others will chime in here, but I wouldn't assume pesticide could not cause this. If the capped brood is exposed (and they have to breathe thru the caps, so they wouldn't be 100% protected) to the pesticide and they die, wouldn't they start to rot? If the hive is stressed and lower in numbers than they were, the bees may not be able to keep up with house keeping duties. In any case, I think I would just dispose of, in a hygenic manner, any comb that looks like that. Not worth the risk of keeping, wether disease or pesticide contamination. JMHO

JC
 

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I did a large removal a few weeks back and the same thing really black comb and similiar milky white substance coming out the broad. The Hive was huge and very healthy so I assumed I did it during cut-out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I didn't keep any of the brood or comb to be clear. Too risky since I knew it had been sprayed.
 

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Right now, around here, I'm frequently seeing similar issues.

For several weeks now, our daytime high temperatures have been at or near 110F (43.3C). Despite my usual assistance to help the bees to cope (plenty of water readily available, shade cloth, thick polystyrene outer covers, and the shade of a large tree - with fogging system), combs of honey are falling from their top bars and frames, many patches of brood are dying (similar to your photos) and being removed by the bees. And, every so often, weaker colonies are absconding.

However, your dead brood, may indeed be caused by pesticides. Brood is very sensitive to environmental fluctuations, pesticides being a severe fluctuation, akin to high or low temperatures.
 

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I don't know your area, but here I would suspect SHB sliming. The pics are a bit dark on my ancient computer, but that was my first thought. I am glad to know you didn't try to save any of that crap! I hope you got paid...it looks like a disgusting mess!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
thanks for the input. we typically dont have shb in my area, so i hadn't considered that.

ETA the slimy stuff is what i pulled out of the capped cells. it wasn't resting on top.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
i have too many hives to responsibly manage right now as it is and don't need to add another one to the stack, so i plan to find the queen, give her to someone, and then newspaper combine these bees with another smallish hive to have a solid workforce.

not knowing if this is some sort of brood disease, pesticide or heat related, or something else entirely, would it be prudent to treat with a course of terramycin for some length of time before combining with another hive? i am very much against antibiotics in my hives, but i don't want to risk endangering the health of another colony by just combining them without knowing what's going on.
 
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