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I would like to hear the different annual treatment regimens of the BS posters. Not what we should be doing, but what we actually do. If we don't know your general geographic location, your response will not be very relevant. So make sure that is in your post or your profile. I will go first:

Late February/Early March: No mite monitoring. I split all of my colonies using a "Fly Back" split. I render one colony broodless with the queen and the other with all of the brood and stores. The night of the split, I do a single OAV treatment of the broodless (queenright) colony. 23 - 26 days later, I do a single OAV treatment of the other box, which is now broodless.

Mid to Late July: No mite monitoring. All supers are removed and stored for the season. I put Apivar strips in all of my hives. I pull them after 8 to 10 weeks (slightly off the US label).

Late September through Mid October: After my Apivar strips have been removed, I check all of my hives with an alcohol wash. I mark the hives that are over 2% and repeat OAV treatments on those hives until I have beaten them into submission.

Between Thanksgiving and Christmas: To the extent I get broodless, it normally happens right after Thanksgiving. I do a single shot of OAV to each hive. No monitoring.

Note: I keep my colonies in 5 separate yards roughly 10 miles north of the Florida line in Alabama. The use of formic acid and thymol is always very sketchy due to our temps. I have had bad experiences with both, so I do not use them. I know beekeepers in this same location that continue to use them and do not report significant problems. Maybe it is me.
 

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I'm not a consistent poster by any stretch of the imagination, but I'd like to share too. I'll post what I did in 2021.

I'm in Wayne, West Virginia @ 38 degrees latitude, 12 miles south of Huntington along the western WV/eastern KY line, 2.5 hours due east of Lexington, KY.

November/December/January: OAV about three times between late November and early January. Carnis, of course, shut down before Italian, and Italians start raising brood first, so mid-January is getting late for OAV in my area. If this treatment is done, there isn't much need for early spring treatments. If a broodless treatment is not done, getting mite levels down in summer/fall becomes very difficult.

February/March/April: Spring buildup. I treated with formic several years ago, but it didn't affect July mite counts at all.

May/June/July: Oxalic Extended Release pads on early May. Main flow until mid-July. Honey supers are harvested by July 4th. One single 50g Apiguard treatment when the supers come off. Most colonies had removed the OER pads by July. Spot-check alcohol washes had 0-2 per half-cup of bees in colonies with OER pads; 5-6 mites in colonies without pads.

August/September: Apivar strips.

September/October: 30 ml 65% formic acid on 2 meat pads per colony (60 ml per application), whenever the hives were checked/fed and the temperatures were high enough. 2 or 3 applications.

An observation of what I've seen here: colonies headed by strong VSH trait, or grooming trait, (or whatever strong anti-varroa trait) need treatment/feeding in the fall because they seem to prioritize fighting mites over foraging/processing syrup for winter and end up dying early or going into winter with an extremely tiny cluster (even too small for Carnis). My opinion is that those traits help push back the need for treatment, but in the fall they still need help.

Thanks for starting this thread, psm!
 

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I’m a backyard beekeeper with 2-3 hives, living near Seattle (Zone 8, cool summer and mild winter). My queens are descendants of a local Carniolan. I do not do alcohol wash, but may ‘guesstimate’ infestation levels by counting fallen mites. I have had one winter loss and no fall loss since 2015.

August - mid September: Formic Pro, when the temperature is right, regardless of mite counts.
October - mid November (optional): Apivar, if >10 mites consistently fall per day in late September. I may do rounds of OAV instead.
December: OAV weekly, until # of fallen mites (counted 2 days after each OAV) becomes <5. 2-4 treatments are usually needed. If it gets too cold for OAV, repeat in January.
During the brood-less period after split: OAV, just once. Each colony gets a brood break sometime during late spring - mid summer.
 

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I'm a little north of Denver.
I use OAV as our only mite treatment.

Around mid August I start weekly OAV treatments in a series of 7 or 8. Roughly until the end of October.

Then, end of November until the first week of January I do another 4 or 5 OAV. Did the last one yesterday.
It depends on the weather. This year was especially warm, I was seeing drones in December. Which is highly unusual.

Last year I was delayed starting the treatments due to life circumstances. Didn't get started until later in September and I lost 5 of 23 hives.
Next year I will try to start the OAV at the beginning of August.
 

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near syracuse ny
while the bees are still clustered in the spring and timed so I can put my supers on around May 10 I put on Apivar, if I could do a wash and check for mites I could possibly skip this

Pull capped honey after Bass wood, early july and treat one pad Formic pro, 10 days later second pad formic pro.

Start pulling honey 3rd week in Aug, pull the entire yard then put on first Apiguard treatment at the same time. 10 days later put on the 2nd treatment.

Watch to see when the commercial beeks pull out there hives, then treat with OAV, if it stays warm like this year keep repeating the treatments until it's cold enough that the mite bombs stay home.
 

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I am in the Northen Neck of Virginia, soon to become a major source of Loblolly honey. Swarm season begins with the spring and only nectar flow. Harvest what little honey I can get in late June. July begin the first of 6 treatments of OAV twice a week for 3 weeks. Late August the same as before Then in late November a single OAV treatment and again in December followed by another single OAV treatment in January. Then start all over again next season. I have been doing this for around 8 or 9 years now with losses below 10% overwinter. At one time I used to do mite counts but I lost more hives doing mite counts than I have lost to varoa mites due to robbing frenzies in the dearth. Soon gave that up as a dead loss. Feed more sugar overwinter than honey harvested sometimes. Time to find another location but the Dakota's are too cold for me I am afraid.
 

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for me in NJ managing mostly in singles:

April: A formic treatment IF NEEDED. otherwise i keep the formic pads in my back pocket for emergencies.
July/August: Pull honey, split, Apivar 1 or 2 strips depending on frames of brood.
September/October: Apistan 1 strip in shrinking broodnest.
Thanksgiving and Christmas: OAV

considerations: i am not crazy about using apistan. of the treatments i use, apistan has the most effect on queen rearing and drone sperm/viability so i use it last in the year. for me something is needed both late summer and fall to stay on top of mite emigration from nearby colonies, the adorned 'mite-bomb'. both chemical treatments i use when i can have them the furthest away from putting honey supers on. there is a push to use apivar in the spring that i dont fully comprehend. not only are you using a chemical right before honey supers go on (OK according to label) but you are using up an effective treatement in a rotation that you could better use in summer when options are more limited due to temperature limitations. i understand cutting treatment cost by applying to small broodnest, but i think OAV at the end of the year does a fine job cleaning up. additionally, nucs get a blast of OAV ~21 days after cell placement. i am also giving thought to one formic pad in each single when drone brood becomes present. trying to keep treatment costs down but averaging 3 strips and one pad per colony per year aint bad.
fully open to critique/feedback/critiscism..... :)
 

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Stopped yteating entirely in 2012.

Use local (British) bees, ideally swarms from free living survivor colonies. Our genetics are very different to US ones - much broader pool of genes.

Losses same as beekeepers in area who treat. I get less honey and fewer stings.
 
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