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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Why is this queen cell dark?. It is like almost transparent I can kind of see inside. This is a queen less split I made.

Also what happens after queen s hatch to there cups? Do the bees tear them down? Went in a hive that had queen cells but now I can’t find any. Probably too soon to have a mated queen so no eggs. And they didn’t swarm. So I will check back in a week
 

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The queen cells will be dark because they are using scavenged wax. Vacated queen cells can be torn down very quickly or sometimes are still there after a week. Probably depends on how plentiful the work force is.

Did the bees start only one cell? It is strange not to have some capped brood nearby. Whether it is true or not, it is commonly claimed that the more ridged and prominent the cell shaped cuppings on the outside of a queen cell, the more promise of a strong queen.

I have a rather weak queenless colony I have been giving brood to. Most of the eggs are not being fed and not all the open brood is being capped.They are having a hard time covering the brood they have. Each time given new brood they start one cell

I am thinking it possible that the workers in your split ate the other eggs and brood that should have been surrounding the larvae they started a queen cell on if they are under populated..

Next week I have mated queens coming.

When the flow is on and I make a strong split there are usually 5 to 7 cells started.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
This is a frame from another really strong hive. They were the ones who made the queen cell. There are 2 more on the same frame right next to one another. There is no brood because it all hatched out. Did the split to keep them from swarming.
 

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This is a frame from another really strong hive. They were the ones who made the queen cell. There are 2 more on the same frame right next to one another. Did the split to keep them from swarming.
Well that seems to blow my hunches out of the water!:D
 

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Sick, if the surrounding brood has already "hatched out", then those cells are probably duds. Queens generally emerge before the surrounding brood does.
 

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Sick, if the surrounding brood has already "hatched out", then those cells are probably duds. Queens generally emerge before the surrounding brood does.
That was the clue I was following. The exception which I observed in my unusual situation was because the underpopulated bees were cleaning out brood from areas beyond what they could cover and heat.

I think Sickdogs pictured queen cell is not typical of the construction by a healthy and populated colony about to swarm. It appears to be an emergency cell , not a swarm cell.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
On the other side of this frame there is a lot of brood that hasn't hatched out yet. I was hoping a queen would hatch and this hive would become queen rite. I'll give it 4 or 5 more days go back in and see if anything hatches out.
 
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