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It all started on Wednesday when I was at my friend's house doing girl crafting things, when her husband came in wanting to talk beek things. He was bemoaning having to wait on queens for a week or so and he wants them now as he has a couple queenless and broodless hives. I offered him some brood and/or a tiny swarm in a nuc I had. He eagerly accepted a frame of brood for now and followed me home. We grabbed the frame and then decided to check the swarm nuc as I had not been in it for over a week. We went through it thoroughly and no brood/eggs and no queen. A big surprise to me! I had seen the queen on 2 occasions and she was a good layer. On Friday, I decided to steal a frame of brood from another hive for the nuc so first I went into the nuc to get a frame to replace the "stolen" brood frame. I was in the nuc deciding which frame was best to take, cleaning up little pieces of wonky wax (I am foundationless), etc., not being particularly careful as I have no queen or brood to kill, and there SHE is, my new queen. She must have been out on mating flights on Wednesday because she certainly was not in the hive. She was acting like a new queen, looking in the cells, turning her butt toward the cells, checking fit but not sticking it all the way down, rather hesitant, and not laying eggs yet. The bees were paying some attention to her but not like a laying queen but more so than a newly hatched queen. And she was bigger than a virgin queen. On Wednesday, they were calm, sweet. quiet bees and there were far fewer in the hive and it was a cloudy day. Friday it was sunny and there were a lot more bees in the hive with the queen and they were still calm, sweet, and quiet. So, my lesson, even when they may appear queenless, and even if they are eggless and broodless, they just maybe in a brood break, even in the Spring! AND, most importantly, always manipulate your hives as if they are queenright even if you think they are not because you could be wrong! I was.....:eek:
 

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Re: What important lesson I learned on Firday.......

It all started on Wednesday when I was at my friend's house doing girl crafting things, when her husband came in wanting to talk beek things. He was bemoaning having to wait on queens for a week or so and he wants them now as he has a couple queenless and broodless hives. I offered him some brood and/or a tiny swarm in a nuc I had. He eagerly accepted a frame of brood for now and followed me home. We grabbed the frame and then decided to check the swarm nuc as I had not been in it for over a week. We went through it thoroughly and no brood/eggs and no queen. A big surprise to me! I had seen the queen on 2 occasions and she was a good layer. On Friday, I decided to steal a frame of brood from another hive for the nuc so first I went into the nuc to get a frame to replace the "stolen" brood frame. I was in the nuc deciding which frame was best to take, cleaning up little pieces of wonky wax (I am foundationless), etc., not being particularly careful as I have no queen or brood to kill, and there SHE is, my new queen. She must have been out on mating flights on Wednesday because she certainly was not in the hive. She was acting like a new queen, looking in the cells, turning her butt toward the cells, checking fit but not sticking it all the way down, rather hesitant, and not laying eggs yet. The bees were paying some attention to her but not like a laying queen but more so than a newly hatched queen. And she was bigger than a virgin queen. On Wednesday, they were calm, sweet. quiet bees and there were far fewer in the hive and it was a cloudy day. Friday it was sunny and there were a lot more bees in the hive with the queen and they were still calm, sweet, and quiet. So, my lesson, even when they may appear queenless, and even if they are eggless and broodless, they just maybe in a brood break, even in the Spring! AND, most importantly, always manipulate your hives as if they are queenright even if you think they are not because you could be wrong! I was.....:eek:
Fun read. Well writen and informative. Thanks!
 

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Re: What important lesson I learned on Firday.......

Thanks Cessna, informative, when I saw the yield sign I must admit, I thought it was going to be more about the girlfriend and her husband than the bees.......:lpf:
Glad I was wrong. G
 

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It all started on Wednesday when I was at my friend's house doing girl crafting things, when her husband came in wanting to talk beek things. He was bemoaning having to wait on queens for a week or so and he wants them now as he has a couple queenless and broodless hives. I offered him some brood and/or a tiny swarm in a nuc I had. He eagerly accepted a frame of brood for now and followed me home. We grabbed the frame and then decided to check the swarm nuc as I had not been in it for over a week. We went through it thoroughly and no brood/eggs and no queen. A big surprise to me! I had seen the queen on 2 occasions and she was a good layer. On Friday, I decided to steal a frame of brood from another hive for the nuc so first I went into the nuc to get a frame to replace the "stolen" brood frame. I was in the nuc deciding which frame was best to take, cleaning up little pieces of wonky wax (I am foundationless), etc., not being particularly careful as I have no queen or brood to kill, and there SHE is, my new queen. She must have been out on mating flights on Wednesday because she certainly was not in the hive. She was acting like a new queen, looking in the cells, turning her butt toward the cells, checking fit but not sticking it all the way down, rather hesitant, and not laying eggs yet. The bees were paying some attention to her but not like a laying queen but more so than a newly hatched queen. And she was bigger than a virgin queen. On Wednesday, they were calm, sweet. quiet bees and there were far fewer in the hive and it was a cloudy day. Friday it was sunny and there were a lot more bees in the hive with the queen and they were still calm, sweet, and quiet. So, my lesson, even when they may appear queenless, and even if they are eggless and broodless, they just maybe in a brood break, even in the Spring! AND, most importantly, always manipulate your hives as if they are queenright even if you think they are not because you could be wrong! I was.....:eek:
:no: Sounds to me like you just wanted to get your girl friends man away from her for a while. :lpf: Bee careful.
 

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Good reminder! I have a split that I'm a little puzzled as to what exactly the queen is up to....
 
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