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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I did a hive inspection today and this is my first year. It has been quite chilly since my last inspection. there were a few frames of honey in the supers. When I opened the hive today all of the frames with capped honey were broken like in the photo. At first, I thought it was maybe robbing or something but when I opened the brood boxes they were filled with honey, brood, and pollen. Is it normal for them to move the honey into the brood boxes as they get ready for winter? I think that's why they moved it but there was definitely more honey in the brood boxes. Thanks for the help.
P.S I live in New York
Brown Wood Natural material Pollinator Insect
Brown Wood Natural material Pollinator Insect
 

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I think so yes, it's normal this time of year as the brood nest gets consolidated and smaller they move honey down to surround it in prep for winter. They won't do that so much if you have a strong flow to keep them bringing in more nectar than needed so they keep storing it up above after packing it in around the reduced brood nest.

My bees have done this, they have reduced broodnest and packed honey in around it in the bottom boxes. However, I've had enough flows in July and August that I do still have some honey in the supers.
 

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That honey appears to be crystallized and they have sucked the liquid out. Not the best rations for winter. Is it normal in that location to have rapid crystallization honey?
 

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I pulled some spring honey from a dead out that looked like that. I fed with just dry sugar the fall before. It sure looked like sugar but it could have been crystalized honey.
 

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NY is now in the middle of the goldenrod, chinese bambo flow, wouldn't expect them to be wasting their time yet moving honey around.
 

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they are eating it
be sure to feed to get thru winter if needed.
also not many bees in the pic IMO what was the last mite count?

GG
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
they are eating it
be sure to feed to get thru winter if needed.
also not many bees in the pic IMO what was the last mite count?

GG
Well there was a considerable amount of new uncapped honey in the brood boxes. And the photo is of a medium honey super so there arent many bees in there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I just watched this video where he says due to the honey being from goldenrod that when they uncap it to eat it it will quickly crystallize.
 

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That honey appears to be crystallized and they have sucked the liquid out. Not the best rations for winter. Is it normal in that location to have rapid crystallization honey?
This is fine honey for reuse for later.
I would put this into storage for spring.

All you have to do - spray water into the cells (no holding back) and feed it back.
Everything will be remixed/reprocessed/used up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I confirmed it. They moved the honey into the brood chamber. There is quite a bit of capped honey in the brood boxes.
I fed them almost 2 gallons of 2:1 sugar syrup.
 
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