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This paper states that "The application of smoke to honey bee (Apis mellifera) antennae reduced the subsequent electroantennograph response of the antennae to honey bee alarm pheromones." In other words, smoke is helpful. Got it.

According to the EPA, smoke "... is composed primarily of carbon dioxide, water vapor, carbon monoxide, particulate matter, hydrocarbons and other organic chemicals, nitrogen oxides, trace minerals and several, thousand other compounds."

But what exactly in smoke is it that has that effect? I've never puffed my hives with just water vapor, or just carbon dioxide, but I am curious if any of you have run any experiments or know of other research?
 

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... The same paper also states that: "A similar effect occurred with a floral odor, phenylacetaldehyde, suggesting that smoke interferes with olfaction generally, rather than specifically with honey bee alarm pheromones. A reduction in peripheral sensitivity appears to be one component of the mechanism by which smoke reduces nest defense behavior of honey bees."

So it may not just be smoke in particular...
 

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I have used water. Not the same effect. I have used water with essential oils. Not the same effect. I have used sugar water. Not the same effect. You can blow on bees and see the effect of CO2. It pisses them off. I'm sure it's the tars etc that temporarly interfere with their sense of smell, which is in their antennae.
 

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I have used water. Not the same effect. I have used water with essential oils. Not the same effect. I have used sugar water. Not the same effect. You can blow on bees and see the effect of CO2. It pisses them off. I'm sure it's the tars etc that temporarly interfere with their sense of smell, which is in their antennae.
Water and sugar water seems to have some positive effect as it takes the ladys some time to clean themselves and put the makeup back on
 

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What the OP should be more interested in is the differences between the various smokes.

Do the bees react exactly the same, no matter what the origin of the fuel?
 

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This paper states that "The application of smoke to honey bee (Apis mellifera) antennae reduced the subsequent electroantennograph response of the antennae to honey bee alarm pheromones." In other words, smoke is helpful. Got it.

According to the EPA, smoke "... is composed primarily of carbon dioxide, water vapor, carbon monoxide, particulate matter, hydrocarbons and other organic chemicals, nitrogen oxides, trace minerals and several, thousand other compounds."

But what exactly in smoke is it that has that effect? I've never puffed my hives with just water vapor, or just carbon dioxide, but I am curious if any of you have run any experiments or know of other research?
The hint of a fire on the way.

for 100,000 years or more bees lived in trees, Forest fires were something needing be evolve to handle.

stay and burn up, gorge leave and reproduce.

GG
 
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