Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
531 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of my hives that overwintered is from a late swarm I caught last year. I wanted to keep them intact this year and not split them so that I could see how much production I would get from them. Last weekend I noticed that they had started drawing out several swarm cells, so I removed some drawn frames and added some new frames with foundation.

I checked back today, and there are still a good 10 to 15 cups drawn out but not yet full of eggs. It sure looks like they're thinking about leaving to me. What else can I do to get them to not require a split? Perhaps remove even more drawn frames and capped brood?

TIA
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,604 Posts
Pulling the queen and a few frames is a good suggestion. What I might do differently is to allow the original colony to produce their own queen rather than cutting out the queen cells. Keep the original queen in a nuc for a while while you evaluate your new queen. If the new queen starts laying well and everything works out, then you have an new young queen in your original hive. If the new queen is eaten by a bird or is not laying well, then you can combine the old queen back in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,404 Posts
Pulling the queen and a few frames is a good suggestion. What I might do differently is to allow the original colony to produce their own queen rather than cutting out the queen cells. Keep the original queen in a nuc for a while while you evaluate your new queen. If the new queen starts laying well and everything works out, then you have an new young queen in your original hive. If the new queen is eaten by a bird or is not laying well, then you can combine the old queen back in.
That is exactly what I am going to try next year. I am going to pull them out early enough in the year that it may be nearly impossible to get a properly mated queen in the hive though. I don't want the thought of swarm to even cross the first bees mind at my place next year.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
531 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Pulling the queen and a few frames is a good suggestion. What I might do differently is to allow the original colony to produce their own queen rather than cutting out the queen cells. Keep the original queen in a nuc for a while while you evaluate your new queen. If the new queen starts laying well and everything works out, then you have an new young queen in your original hive. If the new queen is eaten by a bird or is not laying well, then you can combine the old queen back in.
is there a good rule of thumb for how far out they are from swarming once you start to see cells/cups being drawn out? trying to get a feel for how much time i have to get her out of there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,861 Posts
Seven days for the larva to be capped. Another 7 days for the virgin queen to emerge.
Some said that the hive will swarm by the time they capped the qc. Removing the original
queen early will not affect their ability to make qcs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
764 Posts
Since I'm lazy I would try just moving the colony and replacing it with a weaker one or an empty brood box with a frame with queen cells and a frame of honey pollen mix, that way all the foragers stay at the location of the new box to raise a new queen and the old box now has a lot of nurse bees and a queen but no foragers to force her to swarm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,291 Posts
Pulling the queen and a few frames is a good suggestion. What I might do differently is to allow the original colony to produce their own queen rather than cutting out the queen cells. Keep the original queen in a nuc for a while while you evaluate your new queen. If the new queen starts laying well and everything works out, then you have an new young queen in your original hive. If the new queen is eaten by a bird or is not laying well, then you can combine the old queen back in.
Thats what I like to do. Basically turn one hive into the cell builder, then pull frames of brood from the other hives to produce nucs. The lack of a queen simulates a swarm and puts them back 3-4 weeks on brooding. The other hives that just have brood pulled will quickly rebound during the flow.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top