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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The capped honey frame storage boxes sold at online bee stores are really expensive. Does anyone have alternative methods of storing capped honey frames that is more affordable? I heard that there’s a regular storage box that happens to have lips that perfectly fits langstroth frames. Does anyone know what they are?
 

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Your description is probably causing confusion. Until extraction, “capped honey frame(s)” are almost always stored in the same “storage boxes sold at online bee stores” - that is, the original honey super, whether a deep, medium, or shallow. The only viable long-term “alternative method” to avoid crystallization is to buy a freezer for “capped honey frames”. After extraction, bottling tanks can become expensive, but extracted honey can be stored in any food-grade pail.
 

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Why are you looking to store capped honey frames rather than leaving them on the hive until you're ready to extract?
 

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The only way I would store capped honey frames is in the freezer. If you don't freeze them after removal from the hives, the risk of hive beetle eggs hatching is fairly high in my area.
After extraction, I freeze the wet frames for a couple of days, remove to thaw for an hour or so, then place them on the hives for clean-up. Long time storage, I spray with Bt-A, then back into the supers stacked to the ceiling. It sounds like more work than it really is.

Alex
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I can’t reach above 3 boxes tall without needing a ladder (2 brood box, and one deep honey and possibly one medium). My bees are very productive this year so I’ve been moving out frames. My extra fridge is now full but the next club extraction party isn’t till Labor Day. I’ve crush a few frames but prefer to save them for extraction. Last year, I saved a few honey frames for the bee for winter feeding in coolers left outdoor ended up getting wet with mold. So this year I’m looking for other storage methods and will keep them in garage. I live in CA and ants are the only problem for capped honey (I usually freeze beforehand to make certain any beetles or mites are dealt with). I also need better storage boxes for the frames for winter as I’ll have more drawn out frames this year.
 

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I just leave the capped honey on the hives. If your hives are getting too tall then move a box of capped honey to a hive that is less tall.
I dont bother trying to store capped honey too much bloody work. Let the bees store it until you need it.
Uncapped and extracted frames i put back out in the apiary in their super on its side in the middle of the apiary and the bees will clean it real fast. Then the empty dry super is stacked on an upturned outer cover with moth crystals and another cover over the top.
Have so far in 5 years had no wax moth issues doing this.
This is the first year i will be using an extraction line of sorts with a heated uncapping tank,a 20frame maxant powered extractor, a heated clarifying tank, a honey pump , a honey filter and a heated bottling tank. Prior to this year i just uncapped with a knife/plane, extracted and ran the honey through a double sieve into 5 gallon plastic food grade pails for storage. I probably still have 10 or so of these pails in the basement.

My maxant wax melter has an insert to allow the pails to be reheated to uncrystallize the honey again.
 

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Fully understand the not wanting to work bees or anything else off of a ladder. I do remember an old post where folks were discussing storing drawn but empty frames in plastic tubs over winter but it's been awhile ago. If ants are your only problem and you are storing in the garage, why couldn't you just leave the frames in the supers and tape the "joints?" I know buying an extractor doesn't address the OP but does address the storage issue, may lighten the need for woodware and drawn comb.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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I agree with Eikel, the best solution is to simply buy an inexpensive extractor and not worry about storing capped frames of honey, other than the few you plan to save for the bees that you keep in your freezer.

Uh, that would be the honey frames in the freezer, not the bees.:)
 
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