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For me the most important sensor is weight sensor, because I want to determine winter food stores and I want to know which colony swarmed. Low price of assembly is also essential because there are no big benefits.

Wi-Fi is not feasible because of its range
IMO Wi-Fi + 3G/4G router is feasible.

Two wi-fi scales:

wi-fi-vaga.jpg
 

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Hello Viesest,

This is very informative. Does something like this exist commercially for purchase already? Perhaps it could be something that we suggest to include for them.
 

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Does something like this exist commercially for purchase already?
I expect that global dashboard for data (with google adds) can be free for users, and price for single scale some 20$. There are (expensive) scales for beehive for monitoring yield, but for my stationary bee yard that information is not important.
 

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Weight is the most important. It tells you when the honey flow is happening, how productive the hive is, and if the hive has sufficient stores to overwinter. I hypothesize that with that data you would even know when a hive is running out of space and it it is time to add another supper to store more honey.

Alex
 

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Weight is the most important. It tells you when the honey flow is happening, how productive the hive is, and if the hive has sufficient stores to overwinter. I hypothesize that with that data you would even know when a hive is running out of space and it it is time to add another supper to store more honey.

Alex
Hey Alex!

Ok so weight is more important that temperature? My understanding was temperature was the gauge to tell if the hive was in danger?
 

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Weight is a leading indicator. Healthy dry bees with food can keep themselves warm without a problem. In the winter, wet bees are dead bees. Hungry bees are dead bees. Sick bees are dead bees. Temperatur is a lagging indicator. When the hive is cold you know your bees are dead but it is to late at that point. Note bees predominantly heat the cluster to keep warm, they do not try to heat the hive during the winter.
 

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Ok so weight is more important that temperature? My understanding was temperature was the gauge to tell if the hive was in danger?
The temperature will tell you if the cluster is still on/near the temperature sensor, but will not tell you tons about the health of a hive. A scale will tell you about how much the hive is bringing in and how much stores it has. Neither a scale or a temperature sensor will tell you if you have mite problems until it is to late.

I have a data logger (with weight, temperature, and humidity) on one of my hives. It is logging everything to a SD card and I go and grab the data with a computer every few weeks. I put up some graphs in the "today in the apiary" thread earlier this week.

The data logger is interesting, but it is not a substitute for experience or an inspection.

As with other stuff, good sensors are more expensive then cheap ones. If you want a good scale (that does not drift, with a high enough range, and not to temperature sensitive) it is going to cost more, but you sometimes learn more with better sensors when you are not chasing a bunch of noise.
 
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