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I have a colony that has been struggling with chalk brood. I first noticed the problem on 4/7. This was a few days after a new queen commenced laying. 10 days later I had to treat with Formic acid for a high varroa count, so I had to keep the SBB closed.

I asked the hive host to remove the SBB tray after the mite treatment but she never did, so when I inspected today the mite count was good but there were a lot of mummies in the broodnest and on the floor. Today I opened the SBB and removed a couple of frames from each box and added follower boards. I'm hoping the improved ventilation, young queen and reduced amount of real estate to take care of will help them sort it out.

My question is what to do with the frames I removed. Some were drawn comb and some we're just wax foundation. Can I use the foundation in other colonies? Or should I just toss all of it?
 

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I had a case of CB some years ago, with requeening it went away and I disposed of no equipment. It bounced back briefly in the next spring only to disappear for good.
I would guess if one were to do a shook swarm method and all new equipment one would be safer than doing nothing at all, but considering it’s not a death sentence to a colony and can be dealt with in other means it’s rather extreme IMO.
 

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I'm hoping the improved ventilation, young queen and reduced amount of real estate to take care of will help them sort it out.
You're quite right to conclude that the outbreak of Chalk Brood was due to inadequate ventilation, for as I'm sure you know it's caused by the fungus Ascosphaera Apis which thrives under humid conditions. But - in order for that outbreak to occur in the first place, it's fungal spores must have already been present.
I can only speak for beekeeping in this country, but we have come to accept that some fungal spores will be present in every hive, and on every item of beekeeping equipment, and so there's really no point in destroying anything, or sterilising anything - because the fungus will just keep coming back.

The steps you've already taken are exactly the right ones, and with luck the problem will now disappear - although it will always be lurking in the background just waiting for a chance to flourish again.

I'm finding that hives standing over grass suffer worse than those positioned on hard-standing - presumably because of the increased humidity of the micro-climate to be found over a grass surface, due to the reduced surface-water run-off there.
LJ
 

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Little John summarizes the current thought in the US also. Most requeen and the problem resolves. If you have mummies in the frames you are asking about, you can freeze them and then bang the frames against something and most will fall out. Freezing just makes the mummies come out easier, it does not kill the spores. The bees in a strong hive will remove the rest. J
 

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I get chilled when I hear ventilate more based on what I have read. A good site to read = https://www.hgsc.bcm.edu/sites/default/files/images/review_Chalkb.pdf

Yes, it seems higher humidity increase the occurrence of chalk brood but so does reduced temperatures around the brood. Increasing ventilation seems to be a good idea but keeping the brood at rearing temperatures seems more important, at least to me. This is especially improtant when brood development outruns the ability of the nurse/worker bees to keep up. Honey bees are pretty good at controlling RH and brood nest temperature if given a chance. I would assume any "single" entrance, top or bottom - bottom preferred, of decent size would allow vapor pressure and if needed fanning, to control RH in the hive. But if temperature control exceeds the bee's abilities, all bets are off.

Hygiene steps, removing and cleaning comb, has to help. Increasing the number of workers has to help. The fungus is everywhere but reducing concentrations, keeping brood at proper temperatures is the way to go IMO. You can kill the spores at 60-70C (140 - 160F).
 
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