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Howdy all.

I have two hives that wintered over fantastic. This weekend I went in them to rotate the boxes and do some housekeeping. Hive #1 was all "Hey man, come on in. Poke around, hang out." Hive #2 was all "RRAAWWRRR!!! ATTACK!! RELEASE THE HOUNDS OF WAR!!" It took me twice as long on the second hive because they were just bombarding me constantly. I even walked away to let them calm down and they followed for well over 150' and kept attacking for probably 15 minutes before they lost interest. I did use some smoke when I initially opened hive #2 but not a lot. After they left me alone I headed back down to finish up and retrieve my gear and I got about 3 feet from the hive when they actually came right back at me. I just ignored them this time, finished up grabbed gear and left. Is it normal for one hive to be so pissy and aggressive? Is there anything that can be done? Thanks
 

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I have 2 colonies that have become "man-eaters" this month. I think it is because the queens have used sperm from different drones than they were using before. They went from laid back, no smoke, no veil needed, to meet you when you get out of the truck bees. They are next door to my home so they will be re-queened soon.
 

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I would give them a few weeks, and if they did not settle down, then I would re-queen.
 

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The proper amount of smoke helps a lot. One long, slow puff into the entrance, two if it's a large hive full of bees, then a quick puff under the telescoping cover. Give it a minute to circulate through the hive, then start work. Another puff or two across the top of the frames if they get frisky should be all you need.

Queenless hives are MUCH more aggressive, and will pour out over the sides of the boxes quickly. Ditto for a hive that has excess hive beetles, wax moths, or something scratching on it at night like a skunk.

And sometimes they just don't want you in there. Weather makes a difference, on cloudy days with rain in the air they will hit you before you can get the lid all the way off. This is partially due to the presence of all the foragers since they aren't flying out collecting nectar and pollen, and since the next job after foraging is guard bee, they can be really cranky when cooped up.

The ultimate solution is indeed requeening, but wait a few weeks to see if they calm down.

Peter
 

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If they aren't queenright with a suitable queen - introduce a suitable queen of desirable genetics to them - promptly.

If they do have a queen that is producing a good amount of brood, with a good pattern, you need to find her, extirpate her and replace her with a queen of more suitable genetics.
 

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Even though we didn't see her, there were lots of brood so I would assume there is a queen. I will give it this season and if they don't calm down I will re-queen for next year. Thanks for the advice all.
 
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