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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just cut out twenty frames of comb honey , and put the empty, sticky frames twenty feet from the hive along their flight path for the bees to clean.
It's been two days and the only things on the frames are flies. :scratch:

I'd rather not open the hive and put them inside becasue 1) the weather is getting very cold at night, and 2) the colony is hot and won't let me get within twenty feet without sending out the troops to chase me 50 yards home.

Any other ideas? Our flow is still going strong. Perhaps that's the reason for their indifference.
 

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What NasalSponge said - - -
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You could try taking a few of the frames, hold them in front of the entrance of the weakest hive, wait until twenty or thirty bees have landed on them and have begun to feed, then while moving them carefully, so as not to disturb the feeding bees, replace them in the supers you pulled them from. Sometimes this can get the ball rolling, even if their is a flow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Can I store these frames until the flow is over and then put them out? How do you store sticky frames without making a mess or attracting vermin?

Joseph, I only have the one hive, and they're mean as can be. It's also started raining, which they hate, and will be for the next several days.
 

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Man up, put them back in the supers and put them back on the bees! If these bees are that mean how did you get the supers off?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Alright. I'll (wo)man up and stick 'em back on. Getting the supers off was a huge ordeal. They chased us almost a quarter mile away and after 10 min of standing there, we finally just crushed the rest that were buzzing around. 65 stings in my hubby's jacket alone. My kids have been getting stung, too, though they're 50-75 yards away from the hive. I've got to get over the fear and just do it. Maybe they're cranky because they're overcrowded. Stink.
 

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Are you using smoke? Start a smoky fire in an empty soupcan and put it a few feet upwind of the hive so the smoke gets blown at the bees. Or fan the smoke at them gently with a piece of cardboard.

You can lean the frames onto the entrance of the hive. The bees will clean up the frames.

You can also stick the frames back in boxes in the hives.

Weather can also play a factor. There was a light mist the other morning at the first yard we pulled honey from. I knew I was taking hits in my legs through my jeans but didn't pay it much attention until we were in the truck and leaving - my jeans looked like a pincushion with all the stingers. 65 stingers in a jacket is nothing - I had a couple hundred stingers in my jeans on the back of my knees...and we were using smoke.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Easy mistake, Fish Stix. The name "dehavik' doesn't tell you anything. (It menas "the hawk" in Dutch, but that isn't gender-specific, either.) I'd be curious what perentage of beeks are female. My supplier from So.Utah said he's seen a lot more women than ever picking it up in this state.

I always use smoke. Every time, and correctly. Good perspective on the stings, though. Guess I should stop complaining. Often, at the first whiff of smoke, they seem to know I'm there and come out fighting. I'm burning dried grass clippings and wheat straw. Maybe they don't like the bouquet...
 

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I'd be curious what perentage of beeks are female.

I have some beekeeping videos on YouTube.

I currently have 6,340 video views.
18% women viewers; 82% guys
The 45-54 age range is the most popular for women - a touch over 10% of all my video views are from women aged 45-54. (There is virtually no female interest in beekeeping videos under age 45.)

I assume these percentages correlate to beekeeping women. If they have an interest in watching beekeeping videos, they likely have an interest in keeping bees.

Out of the 12-15 regular members in my local bee club, there are about a half dozen women who attend regularly.

According to last years registered apiaries in my county, 8 of the 62 apiaries are registered in a woman's name, and 4 additional apiaries are registered in a husband and wife's name.
 

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When I got back into beeking I was amazed and SURPRISED HOW MANY WOMEN were beeks, I knew of none back in the day, I like it!! :D

Sorry about the cap lock
 

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Beekeeping is such a JOY when you have gentle bees. Gentleness is NOT NATURAL ! Survivor bees survive for a reason - because they are FEARED ! I have had bees just like dehavik. Never again. I WILL NOT TOLERATE mean bees ! Fire that thug "survivor" queen amd put in a "bought" queen and you will have gentle bees by May.
It may be too late to requeen in some areas and queens may not be available this late. I got my bees from Walter T Kelley Co. I do not wear a vail or gloves - stung only one time this year. I have been through them about 7 times.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Countryboy, I'm going to tweak your numbers by watching a bunch of videos. I'm a female in my 30s. Time to tip the scale.

Anja
 

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Hi Anja! Glad you got some cut comb honey this year....
You made a comment earlier in this thread that your bees might be cranky because they're crowded. Some would suggest you should have at least a two story, 10 frame, deep box brood nest. Medium boxes require at least three for the brood nest, sometimes 4.

In addition, if the flow is still on, they need lots of space to store nectar while they convert it into honey. Now, IF it was my hive, and I had no empty frames of comb to put on, and IF the flow is still going, I'd put foundation in those frames and return those supers to the hive. Reason being, why miss any honey in a flow? If there isn't enough flow to draw and fill the frames, at least you'd have them partially drawn for next year.

As others have suggested, you might want to requeen. However, personally I would not requeen now, as the odds of getting a good laying queen are not good. Plus if anything goes wrong, you have no time to fix it before winter, and you risk losing the colony. I'd wait until next spring for requeening for those reasons.

And with the number of women beeks, maybe "man up" ought to be changed to "gut up?" It does take guts to keep bees, especially cranky ones! :lpf:
Regards,
Steven
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I read in several places not to expect any harvest the first year. I got my bees on June 1st and they got right to work. Their two deep hive bodies filled up fast and the two supers I just pulled were 45 lbs. each and not a cell uncapped. It was difficult to destroy such beautiful comb honey! Someone said the meaner the bees, the more productive they were. With my tiny bit of experience, I'd have to agree. I'm putting the empty supers back on today and will pull them off at the start of winter (first of Oct. here). I think these bees will survive the winter just fine. I'll check their temperament in the spring and requeen then, if needed. Aside from their aggression, they've been superb!

One hive + ten weeks = 60 lbs. of honey!
 
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