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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My bees swarmed on me a while back and I missed it :( Anyway, since then I'm seeing brood but not that much. I have 2 frames that look like they have brood in them but literally it's down to one side of the frame each (these sides are facing each other). My bees however keep socking away honey in the brood chamber. There's no room for any brood unless they move things around. The super hasn't been touched nearly as much as I think it should. I do have a queen excluder between the brood chamber and the super. Is that what's wrong? How do I get more brood production and honey in my supers?
 

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how are the egg's? do you have that? if not make sure you have a queen. and if you do you might want to replace her if you have poor performance out of her. or you might be queenless.
 

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...I have 2 frames that look like they have brood in them but literally it's down to one side of the frame each (these sides are facing each other). ....I do have a queen excluder between the brood chamber and the super.....How do I get more brood production and honey in my supers?
If I were you I'd be way more worried about the amount of bees and brood you have right now than about getting any honey. No bees, no honey. It sounds like the queen may be honey bound on both sides and excluder bound on top. She needs more available brood space to lay in.
 

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i am a newbee too but i think the above post may help.

If you don't have a queen in this hime i would suggest taking a frame or two of eggs from another hive ( if you don't have any eggs in the hive you are talking about) so that they have a chance to raise a queen.

Also i think its called checkerboarding. it worked well for me last year to encourage hives to move up. Basically take partly full, full and or capped frames from below and move them up replacing the frames from below with foundation or drawn comb. you alternate full/capped comb with emptys. You don't want to break up the brood though.

so if E is empty and F is full or partly full and B for Brood and eggs etc your current situation would look like this

EEEEEEEEEE
FFFFBBFFFF

you would make it look something like this

EFEEFFEEFE
EFEFBBFEFE

hope that makes sense. I think this is typiclaly used only in the honey suppers but i can't see why it wouldn't work with this,... just make sure you don't break up brood and eggs etc. Hope that makes sense
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
OK, I went back and checked and here's the scoop. The hive swarmed about a month ago at this point. Previously, I made another thread stating I couldn't find anything (brood/eggs) and that's when I was informed a swarm just headed out.

Now I think they should be back in gear but they're not. I see small larvae that have not been capped yet. So by reading some of these responses I think I either have a lazy queen or she has no room. I just started last year so I only have my 1 hive. I wanted to catch the swarm but I missed it so I have no other hive to draw from.

so at this point, should I try the alternating frame method? How can I promote the bees to put the honey in the super? If it matters I have my queen excluder on top of the brood chamber.
 

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I have found that it is not good to use a queen excluder in a honey super with undrawn foundation. The bees don't like to go through the excluder and when the brood box is full they tend to swarm. Once you find swarm cells they generally have decided to swarm and there are limited ways to try and save your queen, if she is good i.e. split the hive. I'm a new beek and have learned the hard way. Once the hive has swarmed, you need to check for a queen that may be ready to hatch out --- it will take up to five days if you have queen cells capped at least and another five days for her to get fertilized. Then at least 21 days for the eggs to develope. So you are looking at little over a month from the time the queen hatches to the time your first brood hatch. It's a long wait. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
This is an established hive. All my comb is drawn out both in the brood and super. It's the same set up I had last year. It seems that they put all the honey in the brood and then move up. They made it through the roguh winter last year in style. I had a very strong colony when spring came. I just would like a little more honey production up top and not so much down low. As of right now I hae yet to super up and by the looks of it, that won't be anytome soon.
 

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If you are running a 2 deep hive take it down to one deep put all your brood in it and some frames of honey then an excluder and honey super on top.
take away the frames and box not being used and keep it to put on after your main flow.
When a hive swarms it takes quite a while to build up again and if you have a 2 deep unit they most often will fill the top brood box with honey and then quit.
If you have a honey flow still on I can guarantee you will get a crop of honey if you knock it back to one deep.

frazz
 
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