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Discussion Starter #1
I'm a rookie and I am trying to determine what I am looking at in these photos. I have not been able to see eggs as my eyesight isn't the best looking through the veil. This comb is only four days old built on bare top bar. If someone would be so kind to carefully check out the cells in this photo... do you see any eggs? There are lighter and darker areas of comb. What does that tell you? I'm sorry for the crappy photos. I meant to take photos straight on so you could see in some cells, but, in my excitement I rushed through the photo taking. If you can't tell then; it is what it is, and I'll just wait until my next inspection and get better photos.

These two photos are the front and back side of one comb. The queen is in the second photo, on the left side a little less than halfway up the edge. I saw her at first with her butt in a cell so I am assuming she is laying, but... I hope to wait a week or two and make another inspection to see if there are several stages of brood.


JG269660.jpg

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Sorry, but it’s hard to tell much from the pictures. If you are having trouble seeing eggs, just wait a few days longer to see if there’s larvae in the cells, which should be easier to spot. If you start seeing larvae and then capped brood, you know you are good to go.

The eggs will be tiny rice shaped specs in the center of the bottom of the cell - very hard to spot. Might try using a flashlight or getting the sun at just the right angle to shine to the bottom of the cell.
 

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Sorry, but it’s hard to tell much from the pictures. If you are having trouble seeing eggs, just wait a few days longer to see if there’s larvae in the cells, which should be easier to spot. If you start seeing larvae and then capped brood, you know you are good to go.

The eggs will be tiny rice shaped specs in the center of the bottom of the cell - very hard to spot. Might try using a flashlight or getting the sun at just the right angle to shine to the bottom of the cell.
I agree with you. Just wait for extra few days.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks Nelson. I guess I just need to be brave and remove the veil if the bees are not being pissy when I am inspecting. That'll make it easier for these old eyes to see the eggs. In my first hive (four weeks older) I wasn't worried about it as I saw larvae so I could assume a laying queen.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Looks like drone comb, those are large cells.
David, Geez I hope not. That'd be a lot of drones. Queen has larvae and capped brood in the frame area, so, I hope you are wrong. : )

Photos are a comb in the top bar area... Natural comb, no foundation.
 

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Thanks Nelson. I guess I just need to be brave and remove the veil if the bees are not being pissy when I am inspecting. That'll make it easier for these old eyes to see the eggs. In my first hive (four weeks older) I wasn't worried about it as I saw larvae so I could assume a laying queen.
I understand your frustrations. I almost always wear a veil too. A small mag light or equivalent is wonderful when looking for eggs. It is especially hard when looking for eggs on that danged yellow foundation or on new bright yellow comb. That’s one advantages of reusing the old ugly brown/black comb. 😂
 

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I'd recommend the LED mag lite, a bit pricy at around $25 but the added brightness really helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
So, I opened the hive up for another inspection to check for eggs. I took some straight on photos of cells and after looking on my computer screen saw this. Yahoo!

I wish I remembered how I got the focus on the backs of the cells!

JG299685.jpg
 
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