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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Last winter I had a hive that was one deep and it made it through and built up with a vengeance. On top of that it was one of the coldest winters in a long time here. So that brings me to the question would one deep work and could that be standard practice? I did not even have to emergency feed either! It is just a thought and was wondering if anybody else over winters in one deep and how that works in the long run.
 

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I know some migratory beeks that go to FL and they run them in a single deep through the winter. They also feed them starting about Dec. when the maples start producing pollen.
 

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You can winter in one deep in Wisconsin. We run one deep brood chambers for ease of inspection, and reduction of number of frames that had brood on them.


Roland
 

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Around here, western MA. most of us winter in double deeps with plenty of honey. Then Mike Palmer comes to speak at our meeting about overwintering nucs. So last summer I started a few using queens from Mike, plus one frame of bees, one frame of pollen/nectar. Monitor to be sure they don't get too crowded and swarm. Five frames in single nuc boxes, setting on sawhorses. To see the results, check out the one minute video I posted in the photo/video section. I'm definitely doing more this year.
As far as just running one deep box for the season, more bees can mean increased production, so it would make sense that a larger brood chamber = more bees = more honey.
 

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I run only 1 deeps. Some of it has to do with not wanting to lift a full second deep. The other reason is because that's they way I was taught.
If you choose to run single deeps, you'll need to do a couple of things...
1. You must run an excluder. Otherwise it's almost 100% that the queen will get into your honey supers. Don't listen to the anti-excluder gang. I get plenty of honey with an excluder.
2. During the honey flow, you have to open up the hives once a week to check for swarm cells. If you're wanting to expand your # of hives, you can take a frame or two and make nucs. Most of the time, I don't do this. Instead, I pinch the swarm cells off.
3. They overwinter well in a single deep here in the south.
 

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I run only 1 deeps. Some of it has to do with not wanting to lift a full second deep. The other reason is because that's they way I was taught.
If you choose to run single deeps, you'll need to do a couple of things...
1. You must run an excluder. Otherwise it's almost 100% that the queen will get into your honey supers. Don't listen to the anti-excluder gang. I get plenty of honey with an excluder.
2. During the honey flow, you have to open up the hives once a week to check for swarm cells. If you're wanting to expand your # of hives, you can take a frame or two and make nucs. Most of the time, I don't do this. Instead, I pinch the swarm cells off.
3. They overwinter well in a single deep here in the south.
Please forgive me of my ignorance when i ask when speaking of numeral three in your comment. Are you meaning that your bees overwinter fine with one lower deep and a honey super full of honey on top or were you simply speaking of having only a lower deep box on perhaps a new hive.

Sorry, it's obvious i am a rookie.

Chris
 

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That's all i've ever done and it's never been a problem. I throw a full frame of honey in there and check them late winter or early spring. I feed in early spring and they usually take off like a rocket when things start warming up. Our winters in puget sound are very mild though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I am talking about one deep only no supers above. i did one deep on one hive last winter and it did fine. It is good to see that people do do it with only one deep. Im not sure ill do all my hive might out of 4 I might try one or two again.
 

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Yes, I run only 1 deep with no supers. I have left on a super before that was only partially filled out. Otherwise, it's one deep. I let them keep all of the goldenrod flow for themselves. It's not a very good tasting honey and they can usually fill up pretty good with it. If I see that a hive is struggling late summer/early fall, I will go ahead and feed. I poke in and check on them during the winter. If I see that a hive may be low on reserves, I will place dry sugar on top of newspaper. It keeps them going til spring.
 

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Berkshirebee.- Just because the queen is in one deep, that does not mean that the brood is only in one deep. I believe, but I may be wrong, that I can get more brood from a queen in one deep that is regularly provided empty comb, than a queen in 2 deeps that gets honey bound.

Roland
Linden Apiary, Est. 1852
 

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You can winter in one deep in Wisconsin. We run one deep brood chambers for ease of inspection, and reduction of number of frames that had brood on them.


Roland
Have you had better luck with any particular race of bees when running one deep brood chamber. I'm interested in this concept and any information you can share would be appreciated.

Thanks...
 

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Roland, I'm intrigued. Please share. The beauty of Beesource is sharing. :D
I was wondering what sort of routine you use to ensure that the bees don't swarm and how you go about overwintering a single deep - aren't there too many bees come fall?
I am also interested how you prevent them being honey bound. As a newbie I don't have large stocks of drawn comb and as the bees are building into their second deep they are becoming honeybound. Anything you care to share will be gratefully received. Thanks, Adrian.
 
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