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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After cleaning up my large winter losses which are still unexplained, I wanted to extract the sugar syrup and honey from all frames. I stripped a lot of wax and brood down to foundation as well.
Now i'm in a new predicament. I have over 100 frames that are wet and don't anticipate using them this year. Also alarming is i put out some of them for a week in hopes the local feral hive might want some but almost zero interest.
Should i store these wet with moth crystals? Maybe soak them and dissolve off any honey remnants then store? Don't want to leave them out for the moths to take over. Any other ideas?
 

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I know a lot of commercial guys who store their frames wet in doubled up bags, or stacked with moth crystals. They say the bees take to them way better when they use them again, but that's debatable.

I accidentally left a fully drawn out honey frame last week and when I found it, it was still untouched. Our flow is so strong right now they apparently prefer the fresh nectar. You may want to wait until a dearth for the local population to finish cleaning up for you.

Wax moth can sure be a pain so anything you can do to prevent them isn't a bad idea, but they shouldn't be after the honey, but of course the pollen. Maybe put all the frames with pollen in doubled up bags with crystals and leave the rest to air out?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
i'm going to stack them in my garage storage area with paramoth. going to turn a lid up side down for the bottom as i'm sure they will run and make a mess this summer. i feel good about stripping old comb on these.
 

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some say wet frames "repel" moths due to them sticking to the comb, so there are less eggs.

I would do a swarm trap or 2, try to get a swarm and feed the wets back over an empty deep.
unless you "cannot" have bees.

GG
 

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Is BT an option here or not recommended on wet frames? In my world, I would be more concerned about #@??=#!! mice and other rodents,and bears. It would be costly, but heavy duty, well sealed totes may be the best option. J
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
some say wet frames "repel" moths due to them sticking to the comb, so there are less eggs.

I would do a swarm trap or 2, try to get a swarm and feed the wets back over an empty deep.
unless you "cannot" have bees.

GG
In New england swarms are rare. I've only seen one in my 50 years that was not my own. They always make the news.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
In New england swarms are rare. I've only seen one in my 50 years that was not my own. They always make the news.
I finally finished spinning out the mess. Still 50's here so made it tough. My final decision is i'm going to pressure wash them off and then stack them with a fan for a few days so they dry. I know if i store them as is they will mold like crazy and i'll end up pressure washing them next year anyway.
I'm also trying to clean up the frames as i think i have nosema. Jury is still out on that but i'm taking steps as if i do and blasting away old comb down to wax foundation is one step. I'll store with paramoth in my garage as well.
Appreciate all your input. Normally i have freeze temps on the heels of harvest so this has been a new situation.
 
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