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Of course it had to be after heavy winter-kill and with weakened colonies. Now I see carpets of white clover thicker and more wide-spread than I can remember, starting about 3-4 weeks ago. I started three new package colonies, also delayed due to late winter and delayed shipping dates, but on mostly drawn comb. My best hives are only now starting to fill the second hive body with brood and hopefully, populations will be booming in a couple more weeks. My question is, how long can I realistically hope the bumper white clover crop will last and offer nectar?
 

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Deadheading flowers makes them rebloom so I've been mowing my yard that is overran in clover in stages alternating each half every other week and so far the rain has kept up so I have seen bees working clover constantly the last 3 weeks not sure how well it will work in the long run but I think its worth a shot to prolong my small flow
 

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Down here in the southeast part of the state, we've almost had too much rain and too cool temps. It seems like white clover yields the most nectar when the nights are warm and it's a bit on the dry side. We just haven't had much of those until this week. I've had white clover blooming everywhere for three weeks, but the bees only really started working it about a week ago. I'm not sure if there was something else they liked better or what.
 

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I also have more white clover than I have had in years, but I do not see many bees on it. My 14 hives are just 50 feet from a pasture of white clover. I also have lots of yellow sweet clover, but have not seen a bee on it. They sure have been busy bring in nectar from something. I have more honey on the hives now than I did at the end of last year.
Charlie
 

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same here cdevier, but I can only check clover after work. They may be working it after the morning dew. We have a few trees in bloom still, magnolia (lots in Louisville), golden rain, chestnut (only seen a few trees, not many around, mostly males) and some other tree I can't identify. Not mention lilies, and other small plants like hydrangea. Ivy's is about to bloom soon, then dearth sets in depending on clover.

The most important factor for clover longevity is rain, no dry-out. Last year we had clover thru beginning of August until things dried up.
 
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