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Weather.com has a "pollen and allergies" forecast tool, and it occurred to me that it might be able to tell me whether there's pollen for my bees to bring in. Does anyone have experience with this tool? Is it accurate?
http://www.weather.com/activities/health/allergies/

Obviously, the best tool for knowing what's going on in your hive is being there looking at it, but I'm planning to do a good bit of travelling this summer, and wondered if this was a way to monitor what's happening at my hives while I'm gone. :scratch:

Thanks in advance for your replies!
3pianists
 

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I use pollen.com it seems to be pretty accurate for the big stuff. Elms, Maple, ect.
 

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I've thought about weather.com as well.

Ruben, I get my best stomach workout during the cottonwood bloom. Thank God for Allegra!
 

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The thing about pollen forecasts is that they're tuned to windborne pollens, which cause human allergies. The pollens we're concerned about are insect-pollinated, and MUCH less implicated in allergies so not many pollen forecasts include pollens that beeks would want to know about. It sounds like Hambone's includes some though.
 

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Brewcat is right. I report pollen counts for Stockton, Ca. The reason we do not report counts for plants that insects (Bees) forage a lot is that insect pollinated plants do not waste energy generating airborne pollen, they generate nectar to entice insects (bees) to pollinate for them. So the pollen of insect pollinated plants never reach our collection equipment. Consequently, wind pollinated plants do not waste energy generating nectar since they rely on wind not insects to get the job done. There are a few plants that do generate nectar and have pollen that does get airborne, but they are exceptions to the rule.
 

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Old thread, I know. Was wondering about the relationship between weather pollen forecasts and bee pollen collection and/or honey flow. The post above makes a lot of sense. Here in Portland, Oregon, the pollen counts for today are the highest they've been all year. The second picture indicates one of the pollen contributors today is Alder. Per the link below, Alder is one of those exceptions mentioned in the post above.

Alder is wind pollinated, but honey bees do collect Alder pollen. So at least in this case, it seems the pollen forecasts correlate to bee pollen collection.

Weather has been very cold and wet the entire year so far. Today the high reached 59 degrees in some areas and the sun came out. So hopefully a lot of other plants will be blooming soon.

Thoughts on this?

https://honeybeesuite.com/monday-morning-myth-alder-pollen-is-bad-for-bees/

Pollen March 2017.jpg

Pollen 3-31-17.jpg
 

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Accuweather gives a tree, grass and ragweed report. On a side note Maine is the only state today that has a pollen count of NONE for the entire state. However, we are lucky and are very high for dust and dander. Might be why the bees were chasing the dog today. :shhhh:Both should be nil tomorrow with the snow. Dog should be safe.
 
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