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I have liked all of your hive build videos if these videos are yours. I watched many of them before I built my first hive. On hand hold. I made some with a jig from this site and a hand held circular saw. Now days, I just dado slots for hand holds. They are not as pretty but take less set up and are quick and easy.
I put them on all four sides.
Cheers
gww
 

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Yes, that design is a great improvement over the hand-held circular saw method I used previously, in both time and back-discomfort hunched over the saw table for long periods of time, but then I already have a big radial saw, as many folks might not. With this method, it would only take a few minutes to cut all the holds for numerous boxes, not much setup, and a consistent result. I will also admit that as an experienced woodworker, even I am somewhat leery of using the radial saw in such a way like it is shown, but this is nothing if you ever looked at the literature that came with many of these radial saws. If something kicks out of it be prepared to go change your shorts, but if the trommel is securely locked, the work stop is clamped well, AND you are using a push stick like it is shown to keep the stock pressed down AND back, then the risk should be minimal. Thanks again, great idea.
 

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If you look around you can get a nice one for under 200
If you keep an eye on craigslist, you can often see one for under $100, including the stand with casters and with a work top. It will certainly need fine-tuning to get everything plumb and square once you set it up, and probably a lot of elbow grease cleaning it up, but as long as the motor is good, and the trommel can lock securely, then it can be a good tool. In my view the old Dewalt cast iron ones were the best for square and consistent performance, but my old Craftsman works quite well for cutoffs and angles as long as you take normal precautions with such a saw.

If you have never used one, and you are using it for cutoff, PLEASE watch some videos and be careful running it. For instance, if you try to pull a cut through a tough board (or warped board, or wet board, or dull sawblade) the blade can drag, and the saw motor itself can move violently toward you on the trommel when the blade tries to "climb" over the board instead of cutting it. If it ever happens you'll remember it, but just be sure to use the utmost caution, and ALWAYS keep your hands out of the "potential" blade path if the saw climbs. Of course this is easy to say, and most people might think this is stupid to even mention, but because the saw blade moves (unlike how the blade is stationary on a table saw) you can get into trouble if you are not very careful. If you read online, many of these saws have been recalled by manufacturers due to risk of injury. Sorry for the lecture, but I think it may be helpful to any newbies that may want to try out such a saw without too much experience, and if they (god forbid) believe the crazy things like they show is possible in the old owners manual.
 
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