Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
601 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Someone gave me a lot of plastic foundation. I've never used them before. However, I would like to put a film of wax on them. I have all the equipment to do this but have a question about the wax. Is it necessary to have the heated wax with water or can it be used straight? I know in rendering old wax you have to melt it with water in the pan but was not sure if there was a problem with just melting it to be used on the foundation.

Thanks in advance.
Sr. Tanya
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,260 Posts
No water needed.

Just melt and coat on.
I agree. The biggest thing the water does is make it harder to burn the wax because it starts boiling if it gets to hot telling you it it to hot.

You dont need water to render wax either, but it helps clean the junk out of it, so it is a fairly common practice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,549 Posts
Some water under the wax makes it easier to get the round disc out of my wife's double boiler!

I also suspect the water bath slows/moderated the heating of the wax, so less chance of getting the wax too hot and fires.

Once I have the round disc of hardened wax, I break off a wedge shaped piece. Dip the wide edge of the wedge into the melted wax to slightly soften one edge of the wax. Use the wedge like a paint brush to spread a light coating of wax over the foundation. Repeat dipping the wedge edge into the melted wax as required.
 
  • Like
Reactions: gator75

·
Registered
Joined
·
601 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you everyone for your input. Glad you also mentioned things I didn't ask but needed to know.
 

·
Super Moderator
Santa Cruz, CA
Joined
·
1,120 Posts
Water in wax is for purifying it.

I use an old slow cooker on low and dido the foam paint roller.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
949 Posts
Do not add so much wax that you fill the hexagonal imprint on the foundation or else you may end up with a mixture of worker and drone cells or a mess of brace comb.

My water is high in iron and other minerals so I DO NOT use water to clean wax because the wax turns greenish brown.
A small amount of water can also be incorporated in the wax and cause your candles to sputter.
The best way to render wax is a solar melter using paper towels as a filter.
Set up and forget!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Not that you asked, but in case it might help someone else out.....you can also use the wax like a crayon (un-melted wax) and run it across the foundation to wax them. I do this when I don't want to spend the time melting and brushing on the wax.
They draw it out just fine and it gets them nice and sticky with wax.

Edit: If you have a lot to do, it's faster to melt the wax and brush it on as you are suggesting. However if you only have a few to do, I'd go this route in a heartbeat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,183 Posts
Someone gave me a lot of plastic foundation. I've never used them before. However, I would like to put a film of wax on them. I have all the equipment to do this but have a question about the wax. Is it necessary to have the heated wax with water or can it be used straight? I know in rendering old wax you have to melt it with water in the pan but was not sure if there was a problem with just melting it to be used on the foundation.

Thanks in advance.
Sr. Tanya
I just use a block of wax like an eraser and rub it all over the foundation. I used to heat the wax and apply with a roller. I believe I get better drawn comb now and it is quicker.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,183 Posts
Put that sheet of wax foundation where the old women put their girdles and the accountant put his adding machine with a paper roll and his abacus. The times have passed you by. Life still good in Willowbee?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Not that you asked, but in case it might help someone else out.....you can also use the wax like a crayon (un-melted wax) and run it across the foundation to wax them. I do this when I don't want to spend the time melting and brushing on the wax.
They draw it out just fine and it gets them nice and sticky with wax.

Edit: If you have a lot to do, it's faster to melt the wax and brush it on as you are suggesting. However if you only have a few to do, I'd go this route in a heartbeat.
Not that you asked, but in case it might help someone else out.....you can also use the wax like a crayon (un-melted wax) and run it across the foundation to wax them. I do this when I don't want to spend the time melting and brushing on the wax.
They draw it out just fine and it gets them nice and sticky with wax.

Edit: If you have a lot to do, it's faster to melt the wax and brush it on as you are suggesting. However if you only have a few to do, I'd go this route in a heartbeat.
Someone on our state Face Book page describes it as the cheese grater method. Ive tried it on a few frame and it seems to coat fine. I agree, melting is faster if you have a lot to do, but for a few frames, the grater method saves the mess.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top