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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
has anybody used a wax press like this one: Stainless Steel wax press, Honey Press for Beekeeping | eBay
It looks very small and I'm sure there are bigger ones available.
How efficient are they in getting honey out of cappings?
I assume the wax is pressed into rounds discs which can be stored and melted in a wax melter.
Any better ideas to remove honey from cappings for storage?
thanks
m
 

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I do runs of a few hundred pounds in a day. I have a small wax press, with a perforated cylinder as the wax holder. I have learned to just use the cylinder by putting the cappings in it and working a uncapping knife up and down vigorously, flipping it over, and repeating the process. Then it drains overnight. I do lose a little honey which could be recovered in a heated pot, whatever. I don't worry about it as I make more honey than I can sell.
One could just buy the perforated screen and make their own cylinder. No need the press.

A better option is a cappings spinner. If you are producing say, 10000 pounds or more a year, I imagine the spinner would be a good investment.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I do runs of a few hundred pounds in a day. I have a small wax press, with a perforated cylinder as the wax holder. I have learned to just use the cylinder by putting the cappings in it and working a uncapping knife up and down vigorously, flipping it over, and repeating the process. Then it drains overnight. I do lose a little honey which could be recovered in a heated pot, whatever. I don't worry about it as I make more honey than I can sell.
One could just buy the perforated screen and make their own cylinder. No need the press.

A better option is a cappings spinner. If you are producing say, 10000 pounds or more a year, I imagine the spinner would be a good investment.
In a good year we make about 10 000 lb's a season - a lot less in a poor year. My problem is space. We are working on a very small footprint.
 

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I have a friend who uses a wax press similar to the one the OP referred to. It works good for him except the top cross bar starts to bend after applying a bunch of pressure. The other thing is that it takes a bit of manipulation to remove the block of wax after pressing.
 

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We do about 1000 lbs a year currently and don't see too much benefit with the lyson press (similar to the op's link). I have never measured how many lbs we get out of the cappings. I suppose the press would pay for itself in a couple years. I find we get quite a bit of honey by just leaving them in the uncapping tank. It does make wax processing a bit easier with a bit less honey in it. I don't try to fill the press with cappings as the disc is quite difficult to remove if it's much more than 1 inch thick when pressed. I have used a nylon paint strainer in the press which is probably unnecessary. Let us know how you like it if you get it!
 

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We do about 1000 lbs a year currently and don't see too much benefit with the lyson press (similar to the op's link). I have never measured how many lbs we get out of the cappings. I suppose the press would pay for itself in a couple years. I find we get quite a bit of honey by just leaving them in the uncapping tank. It does make wax processing a bit easier with a bit less honey in it. I don't try to fill the press with cappings as the disc is quite difficult to remove if it's much more than 1 inch thick when pressed. I have used a nylon paint strainer in the press which is probably unnecessary. Let us know how you like it if you get it!
I actually thought the lyson press is a great choice
 

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To each his own. I have a perhaps smaller but similar press, which I no longer use other than the perforated basket.
FYI, I am a natural cell beekeeper to a large extent. I do use some foundation to help get combs drawn better--straighter. One result of this is I get more wax than one who is using foundation, particularly plastic foundation which seems to be the norm these days. The wax needs to be chopped up before pressing. Otherwise a lot of honey stays with the wax.
I neglected to mention before that I transfer the wax after smashing down into strainer baskets, to better drain.
 

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Why would you get more wax from being natural cell or foundationless versus using foundation? I understand plastic frames having less wax.
 

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Gino may be crush and strain., noit using an extractor.

If it is any indication, I have a press from the early 1900's??? that looks barely used.

Crazy Roland
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Gino may be crush and strain., noit using an extractor.

If it is any indication, I have a press from the early 1900's??? that looks barely used.

Crazy Roland
I see - I don't want any equipment which can't pay for the space or the investment.
I'm in a high humidity environment and find that leaving cappings for a long time will increase the moisture contecnt of the honey above 20%.
Also, we take honey off over a few days ( we are not 70 anymore!) and I let the cappings drain over-night, clean it up and then start the new days uncaping. Ther is quite a bit of honey left.
 
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