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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I think I did something foolish.
Had some wax moths in a honey super and took it outside to clean it.
Shook off 3 to 4 adults. I think I crushed them.
If any got away....
Did I just put my clustering hives at risk?
Don't know as I can do anything now.

Any advice welcome.
 

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Probably no harm especially if it was some distance from your apiary. You are going to be cold and wet for several days so any flying moths will seek dark shelter, like under the top cover on top of the inner cover. You might want to take a quick look there. If the hives are strong the moths won't be a problem, weak hives with extra space is another story, same with SHB. They are both scavengers and pose no threat to strong colonies.
 

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5 ,8 ,10 frame, and long Lang
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wouldn't the wax moths come from "the outside"
they are out there looking for a place to lay eggs so I would think if you see them they are in your county.

If the super came from far far away different story.
Likely they are already there. A strong hive will do its best to repel them.

GG
 

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The OP said they "went outside" to clean it (the super) and shook off several adults. Adults fly and crawl so if the OP was some distance from their apiary when they dislodged the adult moths, the adults probably would not fly back to the hive they came from and put the clustering hive at risk. Because of the current weather the adult moths would seek immediate shelter so their wings would not get wet or body too cold. Wax moths don't kill bees, they are scavengers and are true signs of a weak hive OR a hive with too much space for the resident bees to patrol and manage/protect.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
They are strong colonies with no way to enter except from the bottom. Dont use inner covers.
Bees direct contact with that area.
About 100 feet away.
The OP said they "went outside" to clean it (the super) and shook off several adults. Adults fly and crawl so if the OP was some distance from their apiary when they dislodged the adult moths, the adults probably would not fly back to the hive they came from and put the clustering hive at risk. Because of the current weather the adult moths would seek immediate shelter so their wings would not get wet or body too cold. Wax moths don't kill bees, they are scavengers and are true signs of a weak hive OR a hive with too much space for the resident bees to patrol and manage/protect.
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The OP said they "went outside" to clean it (the super) and shook off several adults. Adults fly and crawl so if the OP was some distance from their apiary when they dislodged the adult moths, the adults probably would not fly back to the hive they came from and put the clustering hive at risk. Because of the current weather the adult moths would seek immediate shelter so their wings would not get wet or body too cold. Wax moths don't kill bees, they are scavengers and are true signs of a weak hive OR a hive with too much space for the resident bees to patrol and manage/protect.
The super came from another aviary.
I was/am? still a bit wary they might fly to my hives which are all strong. It was about 45 when I shook them. If they are okay in the Spring, I'll be very grateful.
 

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The hives at your home apiary will be okay. The cool weather will inhibit the wax moths' colonization of hives (if they were able to find any hives to sneak into). I can remember reading that Michael Palmer thought that even VT's winter temperatures wouldn't always result in the killing of wax moth larvae (can't remember whether he was referring to greater or lesser wax moths), but the cold will slow down their metabolic activities, appetites, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you for reply. I had a state inspector say something similar. He said only the cluster stays warm enough.
 
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