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I harvested 5 supers in August and have finally had a chance to extract. I discovered a pretty terrible wax moth infestation. I have a few questions:
1) what are the small red bits I see everywhere?
2) what is this glue-like stuff I'm discovering occasionally? It's almost like hot glue gun glue. It was on the bottom (I had a triangular escape board on the bottom and top and when I peeled the board off the floor, it was like glue (not honey or propolis).
3) is the whole thing a waste? Or can I still try to use some of the frames that seem untouched?
4) What do I do with the frames that were badly hit? Throw them out? Scrape them and put new wires and foundation in?
5) is there a wax moth support group, because this is quite painful to see when I was so excited to have that much honey to extract in my 2nd year? (I'm joking about the support group, but not really).
Thanks,
Brian
 

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The red bits are mostly likely moth larva poo, they look like cylindrical pellets ;-). I would stop the infestation, putting them in sun should drive the moths away. I would extract and feed back to the bees or just put the frames on the hive. Depending on severity I may keep some untouch frames for human consumption.
 

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1) what are the small red bits I see everywhere?
No idea, can you post some pictures.

2) what is this glue-like stuff I'm discovering occasionally? It's almost like hot glue gun glue. It was on the bottom (I had a triangular escape board on the bottom and top and when I peeled the board off the floor, it was like glue (not honey or propolis).
Again some pictures would help, it could be a thin film of white stuff like silk, if so you should be able to peal it of by hand.

3) is the whole thing a waste? Or can I still try to use some of the frames that seem untouched?
The bees will clean up the comb. Your infestation does not sound to bad;) if some has been untouched.

4) What do I do with the frames that were badly hit? Throw them out? Scrape them and put new wires and foundation in?
You can cut out bad sections of wax if there is some comb left thats worth saving and the bees will fix it themselves, if not just clean the frames up and re use. Freezing combs kills wax moth larva.
 

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Freezing combs kills wax moth larva.
Freezing kills greater wax moth larva. It doesn't kill lesser wax moth larva. To prevent this from happening again, you can spray your supers with XenTari (BtA) at the start of the season and it will protect them for the rest of the season.

HTH

Rusty
 
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