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Invasion! Asian giant hornets have arrived

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/invasion-asian-giant-hornets-have-arrived/vi-BB17cQ0l

They can grow as large as two-and-a-half inches and can slaughter a colony of thousands of honeybees in a matter of hours. And their sting? It's one of the most painful known to humankind. Vespa mandarinia, dubbed by The New York Times as "murder hornets," are the nation's latest invasive species, and correspondent Luke Burbank talks with entomologists and a beekeeper about the threats these insects pose and what's being done to keep them from establishing themselves in the United States
 

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These hornets will be attracted to the honey.
Maybe you can set up a decoy hive that attracts them away from the bees and gives you time to kill them
 

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Over 2,000 "sightings" reported, fuled by media hysterical , 5 have been real, making a grand total of 7 found in the USA in the last 2 years... non have been found in the last 6 weeks, none have ever been found in the US out side Whatcom County, Washington.

by all means lets run around yelling the sky is falling and troll forums with our 1st two posts
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Bonnie, I appreciate your concern over this invasive and highly destructive threat to the honey bee population. It is something beekeepers have been following now for several years and indeed has become more of an issue since being sighted in WA state earlier this year. However, media hysteria has caused reported sightings far outside of the very limited geographic territory the Giant Asian Hornet is known to inhabit. This hysteria is actually hurting the real efforts to track down and eradicate the few colonies that have been established in the US and Canada. Lets talk bees instead.
 

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Two things to add, I caught a Cicada killer the other day. Terrifying looking insect, but very beneficial and not aggressive toward people or honey bees. It does have a resemblance to the Asian Hornet in question. So people need to be careful of mis-identifying that.

Second, I have been having a wonderful conversation on Discord recentlywith a fellow from Laos who is a commercial beekeeper there. Besides just being a fascinating look into how they keep bees there and produce honey without supers, hearing about how the Asian hornet is an issue there but it is not the end of the world. He said mostly they will pick off a few bees, but sometimes will get into a frenzy and can wipe out a colony. But there are measures to mitigate the risk. They do set traps out and have entrance reducers that keep the hornets out. So it might be new and scary to us, but to lots of other beekeepers it is just business as usual, just like dealing with mites.

"Murder Hornet" was a brilliant name given by the media to get as much attention, hysteria, and most importantly, clicks and views. So keep that in mind before going off the rails about it.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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This is going off topic a bit but I agree that "Murder Hornet" was invented to incite panic and media clicks.. Truth is that only higher level species, humans in particular, can commit murder. The birds and dragonflys that kill my bees on a daily basis are simply eating. It is part of the circle of life.
 
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