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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm trying to find ways to keep my honey from crystalizing as I don't think I can use it all by the time it will crystalize. I've been looking at the Mann Lake blankets for 5g buckets. They heat to 110. Will that liquify crystalized honey or only prevent? If memory serves, that temp is still considered raw and won't impact the honey like a higher temp will. Correct?
 

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That blanket is kinda spendy. We have a couple of these, they do a fine job of thawing out a bucket of crystalized honey, takes a couple days. Got them at a bee conference, I think we paid like 15 bucks each.

 

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I built a honey warmer using an STC-1000 temperature controller ($13 on Amazon) as the brains, a couple incandescent light bulbs as the heat source and a few misc electrical cords/components Hive bodies and queen excluders serve as the box/shelves.
The STC1000 is popular for brewing, incubators and anywhere you need temperature control; there a lots of how to wire videos online. The controllers can be set at any temp and do come in C, F or dual.
 

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They really aren't made to keep honey from crystalizing. More to reliquify after it has already crystalized. If you want something to keep it ready to go. Get a botttling tank. I have 3 Maxant tanks I run 24/7 and the honey is always ready to bottle.
 

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What the poster needs is an inexpensive way to keep the honey from crystalizing. 4 - 10 hives is all she runs so a $1000+ bottling tank is probably not upfor consideration. I was drooling on my keyboard last night looking at the Maxant 16 gallon bottler for the 20 some hives I try to keep. Honestly, a nice warming cabinet can be made for a lot less than the cost of just one pail blanket.
 

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…I don't think I can use it all by the time it will crystalize.
It sounds like this is for personal use. Just bottle it into whatever convenient size you wish and let it crystallize. When you are ready to use it make sure the bottle is sealed tight and run with a load in the dishwasher.

For warming 5 gallon buckets Kamon Reynolds just released a video on an inexpensive easy to make bucket warmer.
 

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I've been looking at the Mann Lake blankets for 5g buckets. They heat to 110. Will that liquify crystalized honey or only prevent?
I use one of them, it takes a solid bucket of crystals back to liquid nicely. I do stir a few times after it is liquid as the crystals tends to settle to the bottom.
 

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I sell honey in 5 gallon buckets and now I am retired and don't have all the proper gear, getting them liquid was a problem.

I think the Mann Lake bee blankets are overpriced, but in the end I bit the bullet and bought several of them. In my case, the 240 volt fixed thermostat version to be compatable with my country's power supply.

Now that the shock of paying for them has subsided, I am very pleased I bought them. They have given several years of good service and are an easy way to melt up a bucket of honey.

The process was improved by putting a pet blanket or a brewers blanket under the bucket, just so there would not be a cold spot right on the bottom middle that took longer to melt. I also put a towel over the bucket lids to keep the warmth in.

These blankets are not designed to keep a bucket of honey warm permanently, that will degrade the honey over time. They are designed to turn a bucket of crystalised honey into liquid. My set up will turn a bucket of rock hard crystalised honey into liquid, in 3 days. I just have the buckets stored in the shed, and melt them up on an as required basis.

A number of my hobbyist friends have bought these blankets also, and they are very appreciative, totally solved what used to be a big problem for them. There are some other good methods shown in this thread that are cheaper, and will work for you on a budget. But if you can afford the extra money, the Mann Lake bee blankets are a simple, no fuss way to reliably do the job.
 

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I used and old non working upright freezer. Put a light socket and a baseboard heater thermostat inside the freezer. I turned the thermostat all the way up and when the temperature gets low the 60W incandescent bulb turns on. The temperature is always about 90 degrees. Works great and that is where we store all of our honey.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Lots of good ideas and feedback. Thank you. I'm usually all for diy, but am currently limited on what I can do. Palmer is correct that I need small scale. The price on the blanket does seem a bit high, but from what I'm reading, it will do the job well. It also won't take much storage space. I like the cabinet. Thank you for the link. That may go on my summer diy list. My hopes are to be functioning better by then, depending on how many surgeries are added to the list.
 

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Duda Diesel PHS Small Silicone Pail Heater Adjustable Thermostat 450W 110V/120V 790 mm x 102 mm, 4" Height, 0.06" Width, 31.1" Length
61510



I just bought this band heater from Amazon for my pails and it works great. took about 3 days to liquify the honey. I also would stir the honey 2-3 a day, on days two and three. I payed around $60 for this item. Just keep the temps low on the dial and check the honey temp.
 
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