Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It was 48 today in central Ohio and I took the opportunity to give some of my colonies some candy. I know that it is only December 14 and that they are eating their stores; however, I am a bit paranoid about bee survival. Some would say extreme.

I took the opportunity to put an indoor outdoor thermometer in one of my single deep colonies. It will tell me the temp inside the colony near the cluster and the temp outside. Right now it is 39 ambient and 77 inside the colony. Should be interesting as next week we are getting down into single digits over night.

I will share some of my info to those who are interested and those, like me, who are paranoid about what the temp is and survival rate.

Pife

Oh, by the way all nine colonies are alive and doing well. The hives with two deep have the cluster in the lower box.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
919 Posts
Pife,

Not paranoid here, but certainly interested is seeing some of your data. Can you tabulate the data in some sort of a spreadsheet?

Regards,
Bear Creek Steve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,139 Posts
Try not to disturb them to much in the winter you break the propolis seal that protects them against cold winter winds and they don’t have the ability to repair it. If the cluster is in the bottom box things are good. I usually make my first inspection in late January you get a better observation of which hives need help. The majority of hives that starve will do so in March, buy then the queen has been laying again and they use food reserves quicker.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I am going to do some data tabulations over the winter. Next week we are into single digit temps and it will be interesting to see the hive temps. The other thing that I have done to the outside hives (I have three nucs in the garage) is to put some styrofoam on the outside of some of the hives to help insulated them from the frigid wind.

The engineer comes out as I sit in the house next to the fire and worry about my wards outside.

I have lost hives in the past and it normally occurs in February. Last year I lost 2 of 5 and I knew going in that I would lose one that was weak. I should have combined. THis year they are all strong and the colonies are heavy.

All of this does not reduce my concern.

Best of luck to all that have hives in northern states.

Pife
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
919 Posts
Pife,

Take a look at the following:

http://s791.photobucket.com/albums/yy191/goldcamp/

The North East is not the only place that gets cold in the winter.

This setup consists of : A partially vented SBB, two deep brood chambers, a medium full of honey, an inner cover, a gallon feed can full of 2:1 syrup surrounded by a deep super. All covered by 2" of styrofoam which is covered with tar paper. There is a 2" sheet of styrofoam on top of the inner cover around the feed can. Outer cover on top of the stack. One inch opening to the outside above the SBB and also at the inner cover level. It works!

Would like to try your indoor/outdoor technique next winter. Please post your data collected this winter.

Regards,
Steve

Regards,
Steve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Google a study by Owens done in Wisconsin in the 50s. The word Thermology is in the title. (Dept of Agriculture pub).

When it hits 0 outside, don't freak out if the Hive temp goes down--it will. The bees only heat the cluster, not the Hive--there is a difference.

You should get better readings near the top since heat rises....good luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The bees have moved in the hive. When I first put the thermometer into the hive it was at the cluster which was right below the opening in the inner cover. The temp outside would be in mid 20's and the inside reading was mid 60's. Now it is holding about 40 regardless of outside temp. This tells me that the cluster has moved and that the air leaving the hive (ventilation) is holding pretty steady. It also tells me that they are alive and well.

Next ten days have a high of 32 here in central Ohio so no feeding in foreseeable future. Pife
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,265 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks curious. That is absolutely fascinating. The thermal imaging is spectacular and should help all of us sleep a little better. As long as our friends have fuel (honey) they will be OK. Thanks for sharing. Greg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
When I firt put the thermometer in it was right at the cluster which was near the center of the hive at the top of the frames. This is a single deep hive. That was Dec 10 and I am confident that the cluster moved due to the lower reading. If it ever warms into the 40's I will open the hive to give them some candy. THey have not had a break from the cold since then. Pife
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top