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Just for the "hey" of it and to try something different, I sprayed my hands with unscented DEET prior to working my bees. They move right out of the way!

However, I'd not try to catch queens with the DEET on my hands...... :)
 

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as a spray on....I htink it just repels. I've heard some in my bee club mention how they spray their suit or veil and it keeps them from buzzing or trying to sting thru the jacket.
I'm sure if you were to coat a bee with it....I doubt they'd recover but havent tried. I'll wait for the nxt one that keeps buzzin/bumpin me and give it a try just to see.
 

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interesting..... I know I moved a hive one time without plugging the entrance because I knew I would lose the forragers anyways and it was really hot and my truck had a bed cover. I ended up with several bees orienting to the bed of my truck so I sprayed a piece of cardboard with Buggins all natural bug spray and they left the bed and would not re-enter

http://www.amazon.com/Bugg-22401-Repellent-Gnat-Deet-Free/dp/B00488I44E

gonna have to dig up an MSDS sheet to see what the heck is in it.
 

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I start out barehanded but after several stings will put the gloves on. Not sure how effective it'd be cuz some of the bees that are stinging I think are the foragers returning and immediattlly divebomb me (catch them from the corner of my eye coming in at Mach 3) so not sure if they take the time to sniff me before deciding to sting! I'll definitlly try it for grins cuz I have to have the stuff around anyway cuz of the skeeters.
 

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I don't think a forager is interest in stinging. It is more of an old grouchy guard bee. They all go to flight school and know how to dive bomb from a distance.
 

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I work barehanded without any additives... :)
Same here. I did a cut out from a log a few weeks ago where I had my arm in the log to my shoulder holding a 12" breadknife cutting comb. First cut out I've ever done by feel. Took 3 stings, 2 to the hand and 1 to the armpit all my carelessness. I rarely wear gloves or long sleeves. I don't have bug repellant with deet but I do have bee quick lol
 

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I like to work bare handed. I usually smoke my hands and arms. It may or may not work better...but in my mind I think it does.
 

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I might spray my head from now on. Changed a feeder today and BAM right in the eyelid. I put wire across the feeder holes because this was happening before, but this was before I could even get the lid off of the hive. No more going out there unless I have my veil on.
 

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Been keeping bees only 3 years and decided to go bare handed this year. I too smoke my hands and it seems to work. I get the occasional sting but it's rare. I actually got it today on the wrist. Hurt more there than on the hand. I hate wearing gloves. I keep em with me though if the bees get fiesty.
 

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No special secret in working barehanded. The temperament of the bees is the primary criteria. Dexterity is much better but like DJhoney says, keep some gloves in your pocket.
 

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Like the others, I "spray" my hands with smoke from the smoker and the bees will generally leave them alone/move out of the way when I work. The few times I have gotten stung on the fingers have been because I have pinched or trapped a bee on accident.
 

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I cannot imagine working my bees without gloves, especially two of the hives that just love me so much they are dying you show me. :eek:

And DEET - Well it repels insects, melts eye glasses coatings or any of the non glass lens, removes most finishes on wooden gun stocks, and will melt a lot of plastics. So even we are on the mosquito coast, I go with out. But if it stops bee stings, I might try it.
 

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Does DEET not KIll insects?
It repels them, it doesn't kill them.


re·pel·lent
riˈpelənt/
adjective
1.
able to repel a particular thing; impervious to a particular substance.
"water-repellent nylon"
synonyms: impermeable, impervious, resistant; More
2.
causing disgust or distaste.
"the idea was slightly repellent to her"
synonyms: revolting, repulsive, disgusting, repugnant, sickening, nauseating, stomach-turning, nauseous, vile, nasty, foul, horrible, awful, dreadful, terrible, obnoxious, loathsome, offensive, objectionable; More
 

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Just because it is used as a repellent doesn't mean it isn't also toxic.
DEET is classified as an insecticde. It's only approved use is on people, clothing, dogs and cats...therefore it is listed as am indoor pesticide only (yes, I know we use it outside but that is the technical classification because of how it is/isn't supposed to be used), and therefore hasn't had the battery of toxicity tests that pesticides that would be used in the field (or applied to the inside of a beehive by being on your hands).

I can't imagine putting DEET in any concentration on my hands and work bees.....I'm easing queens and producing food for people to eat.

In any case, DEET is a repellent....and a pesticide....and a floor wax....and a dessert topping.

Deknow
 

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Please keep us informed on how Deet preforms for you in the future. Personally I think it a chemical to keep away from my Bees and Honey comb.
 

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DEET toxicity is way more of a problem for humans applying it to their skin than it is for insects that are exposed to it.
 
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