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Do you need to start both queens as cells or can you introduce caged mated queens on each side? I would probably use push in cages if I can do it with 2 mated queens. If one queen is dies can you introduce a new queen on the lost side or do you just remove the dividers and leave it a 1 queen hive.
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What ever you decide to do, the queens need to be physically separate from each other (they can sting each other through one queen excluder). Also, when introducing a new queen, slowly is the best way to go. If you can cage her while being introduced, then you increase the chances of acceptance. You can just throw her in there, but the bees need to be queenless for at least 48 hours before reintroduction of a new queen. I am very interested in how people's 2 queen setups turn out.
 

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Akademee; there has been much discussion about the benefit of waiting 48 hours queenless before introducing a queen. When I set up my two queen stacks of 4 frame nucs, one of the colonies I guess had started cells on existing brood and the queen was released but disappeared. They raised their own but that put the one side behind the other half and I dealt with one side a box higher than the other. Did some position swapping to redistribute brood. PITA!

Waiting long enough to go back and check for emergency cells is one possibility but it is easy to miss one. If I went that route again I would keep the cork over the release candy till I checked for cells.

Actually I think immediate introduction of a caged queen is less likely to have the workers start emerg. cells. I believe the immediate introduction is Michael Palmer's method. The queen I lost cost me around 60$

A pushin cage is easy to make and gives much better odds of sure acceptance.

It seems like a week of wasted production but if you were introducing a very special queen it might be worth waiting a week till there are no larvae young enough to start cells and they are hopelessly queenless.
 
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