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I had some free lumber that is 3/8 and 1/2 inches thick that I constructed into some 5 frame nucs. Thinking of using them for queen rearing and splits as I am really hardware short due to just starting. Didn't think of nucs and have been trying to make 10 frame mediums so far.

Then I got this stuff and heck at the cost of free, I couldn't pass it up. I was thinking of using it for breeding nucs or splits and once they are established after the spring flow, moved them to 10 frame hives. But I started wondering, will this wall thickness be enough insulation for summer temperatures that move up to mid to high 90s daily and bump to just over 100 on a few days during the average year.

Any thoughts.

Would it help if I made sure they were in the shade?

Anyone try something different like this before.
 

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For Texas, shade is recommended. Wall thickness is relatively unimportant if you are just using it for nucs or queen rearing. It would work for overwintering, but the boxes will be light and likely to blow over in strong wing.
 

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I've seen bees colonize tin mailboxes. You can't get a whole lot thinner than that...
 

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The key is "what is the R value of the timber". From an insulation point of I don't think teh 3/8 or 1/2 " would make a difference. I think the structural strength of the hive and standardization of the hives

My thoughts Geoff
 

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My overwintering nucs are made from 5/8 (19/32 actual) and they've already been through several weeks of -10 to -20 lows and go through 112 highs in the summer for over 3 years. They've all done fine. The 3/8 I've used in the past turned out to be a bit flimsy and very prone to warping despite being well painted. Half inch would be better in my opinion. The 'thinnest' I would personally use would be 5/8 ply.
 
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