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Have made a couple of splits, went to look to see if any of the queens were laying already, but could not find either of the two queens. when they are out mating, are they out of the hive all day long? Just coincidence that I couldn't find them in either of the two splits??
Thanks,
 

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no i think its more like an hour or so. you either missed them or they didn't make it back. In these cases i usually leave everything alone for a few more days up to a week. I've been surprised before so i don't take any drastic measures quickly.
 

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Last year I had the luxury of spending much time watching two hives with new queens, actually I knew they where coming and happen to see one come out on the landing board on the way to check progress.

The 1st day I saw them, it was at 1:15 in the afternoon and low to mid 60's, so for 4 days I was there at noon. Each day they came out between 1-1:45, spent a little time on the landing board, then slowly lumbered off remarkably close times to each other. Longest I had one gone was 40 minutes, but I'm not sure if she sat in the trees any of that time, neither hit the landing board proper and had to walk in. The fourth, day only one left for a short period.

I would say it will depend most on how far to a DCA they have to go, weather (wind) and what perils they face during that time. From what I have read ( a few DCA studies online), shouldn't be to awful long and certainly not all day( my opinion)

I'm with kaizen, I'd wait a few days and check again
 

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If you added mated queens it should take them a couple days to be released from cage then a day or 2 to lay.

If you made split then added queen cells then it will be about 2 weeks before they start laying, and you should generally wait 3 weeks to check.

If you split them and let them raise their own queens then you should give it 30 days and you should see some larve.

It's often hard to see virgin queens in hives as they have no eggs down and are small.
 

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Great read so far, thanks sir. Reading "2.2.Data Analysis", I had noticed the same thing, my queens never just "came home and walked in", always took attention on the landing board for a bit from what I saw. Almost appeared as they (queens) where cowering, but I think it was some kind of bonding deal with the workers as they went over the queens head to toe (pure speculation, but that is what it felt like at the time)
 
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