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Discussion Starter #1
While helping a fellow beek with inspecting her hives (first time this year as she is unable to do so physically) she pulled a frame on which I pointed to and asked "aren't those queen cells?". Yes, she resounded, and she took her tool and cut open one of them, and then slit open the next, and what appeared to be a fully developed queen came crawling out! She asked if we wanted her and I said of course. She also gave us a handful of bees to keep her company. We put all into an old package box, with the can of syrup on place. When we got home, we put the package box into a 10 frame (no nucs available) and added in two frames of brood/eggs and larvae from a neighboring hive. We also put syrup on to feed. The pkg. box was sprayed with sugar water to feed them. Bees clustered around the new queen. Two days later we released all into the lang, and added a couple more frames of drawn out comb. Now here are my questions:
1) The queen has to leave the box to go on a mating journey correct? So does the queen orient to where her new home is, and then make that flight to hopefully return successfully after mating?
2) The nurse bees that came along with the frames of brood and eggs will stay with the brood correct?
3) Other than syrup for sustenance, won't the nurse bees need pollen (which there was a little there in the frames) to feed larvae? And since there are no real foragers (that I'm aware of other than that small handful) how do they get the food they need?

Any suggestions or comments on what we did, or what to do to further insure a successful growth of this micro-colony would be much appreciated. My wife observed today that the nurse bees were feeding and caring for squirming larvae.

TIA
 

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You need more bees, I suggest you shake a couple of frames of nurse bees from the other colony, be careful not to get the queen, I usually take the nurse bees from a honey frame since it is less likely to have the queen, even though they may bee mostly wax makers the colony will make them what they want them to be. Also take a frame of mostly pollen if the colony can spare it. Another method is to simply change locations with a good strong colony, the strong colony will build back up quickly and all the foragers on the new hive will give it a real kick start. Because I like it simple and easy the second method is my favorite, I have even started doing my splits that way, I just put in a frame with a queen cell and maybe one of capped brood, swap locations and check it in a couple of weeks. This also keeps the strong hive from swarming because all the foragers are not there, therefore it is a real good way to stop swarms, at least for awhile.
 

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>1) The queen has to leave the box to go on a mating journey correct? So does the queen orient to where her new home is, and then make that flight to hopefully return successfully after mating?
yes and yes, there is about an 80% success rate

>2)The nurse bees that came along with the frames of brood and eggs will stay with the brood correct?
most will

>3) Other than syrup for sustenance, won't the nurse bees need pollen (which there was a little there in the frames) to feed larvae? And since there are no real foragers (that I'm aware of other than that small handful) how do they get the food they need?
Some will start to forage. As other said you need more bees.

>box was sprayed with sugar water to feed them.
You don't want to attract pests like ants or robbers. Use a zip lock bag cut some slits to feed them. Or a small mason jar with holes in the lid, put this above the inner cover and an empty box on top.

Reduce the entrance to avoid robbers.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
>When we got home, we put the package box into a 10 frame (no nucs available) and added in two frames of brood/eggs and larvae from a neighboring hive.

With the bees that were on the frame?
Yes. Kept all the nurse bees with the frames, brood and eggs. They are staying.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
>1)

>box was sprayed with sugar water to feed them.
You don't want to attract pests like ants or robbers. Use a zip lock bag cut some slits to feed them. Or a small mason jar with holes in the lid, put this above the inner cover and an empty box on top.

Reduce the entrance to avoid robbers.
Reducer is set to 1/2", I actually made one. I've got a board man feeder on the front (I know, throw it away) to this point it has not caused issues. The other hives have their own feed on, on an inner cover, with an extra box as you mention.
I like the idea of the zip lock better than a board man for obvious reasons so I'll change that out. Thanks.

I'll take and shake some more bees into the box from other strong hive, but how much is safe to take without hurting their population and survival (the donation hive)? If for example I have 6 frames covered solid with bees, on brood, honey and or pollen frames, can I shake off one or two of those? (checking carefully for a queen of course)

My other two hive, one is Italians which is where the brood came from. The other is feral Missouri bees. They're different than the others. Smaller, made it through the winter as a small colony so they are survivors. They're up in the mornings going at it while the others are sleeping in. No problem mixing all together? (I'm talking if I pull a frame and shake bees)
 

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. My wife observed today that the nurse bees were feeding and caring for squirming larvae.
They werent really squirming were they?

Bee larvae don't squirm. They lie in the cell in a curled shape, although they do move you have to watch closely and its very minimal.

You don't have larvae squirming on top and through the comb do you?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
You don't have larvae squirming on top and through the comb do you?
No thank goodness. I think she was trying to paint a cute picture and embellishing a bit of what was going on.
Yes, we've seen how larvae just kind of lay there waiting to be fed. Not a bad gig if you can get it.
 
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