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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Took honey off a double deep with 4 supers yesterday. In the past, they have been a little aggressive when I worked them. Sometimes a couple would follow me up the hill to my house about 80 feet away.
Yesterday when I brought the supers back for them to clean up, they were waiting for me. Evidently they were waiting on the FedEx guy too. Didn’t know I had a package coming.
This morning they were waiting when I opened the door real early.
Now after getting back home today from another bee yard, I set here trapped in my vehicle because one jacket is in the house and other jacket is at the other bee yard.
Anyways, the bees have got to go. Worried about neighbors and delivery people.

I have had one hot hive in the past. I re-queened it and everything was ok after a while. Unfortunately, I don’t have that type of luxury with time for this hive.
I can’t get a vehicle close to it to move it since it is down a steep hill. Yeah, living on side of a mountain doesn’t promote good location for hive but they usually make good honey.
Never killed a hive but for safety I think these have to go.
Can anyone suggest something I can put in hive to kill them but salvage comb and honey?
I guess the nuclear option would be to burn them but due to location on side of mountain probably not a good option.
Any advice would be greatly appreciated!
 

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Soap and water will do the trick if you can't find the queen and requeen. By the way for future reference this is why I never put a colony closer than 100 yards away from front door. If you have access to fields close to you ask farmers close to you. Same advice applies to out yard.
 

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I wonder if it is possible to go at night and tape off all air so that they suffocate/overheat?
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Hives in the South can get very testy this time of year. But you stated they have been a bit on the aggressive side in the past and time is not on your side. If splitting them into a bunch of smaller nucs is not an option, soap and water is 100% effective.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So with soap and water, is the comb still useable?
I have read where others have used Dry Ice or CO2 cannister and still used the comb afterwards. Anybody have experience with those?
 

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I just watched a video of a beekeeper in NJ that euthanized a VERY HIT hive; I mean aggressive. He taped it up at night and put a screen on top in place of the inner cover. Next day he poured diary water through the screen seam by seam into the hive. He used about a cup of liquid soap per gallon of water (2 gallons) on two deep and 2 supers. I will try and post the link. He said he would rinse everything off with a hose when done.

Here it is https://youtu.be/O4ldpyIE5t4
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Beekeepers are frugal. Dry ice and compressed CO2 cost money. Soap water in a sprayer is cheap. After the deed is done, simply rinse the combs off with fresh water and allow to air dry.
Frames with capped brood should be placed in other hives for the bees to clean out the dead larvae before everything gets moldy. Eeww.
 

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Beekeepers are frugal. Dry ice and compressed CO2 cost money. Soap water in a sprayer is cheap. After the deed is done, simply rinse the combs off with fresh water and allow to air dry.
Frames with capped brood should be placed in other hives for the bees to clean out the dead larvae before everything gets moldy. Eeww.
:)
 

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If it's africanized or you have neighbors really close that is above my pay grade. I would pull all honey supers (full or not) and put all remaining boxes on their own bottom boards. Put a box with 1 gallon syrup 1 frame of eggs and rest undrawn frames in old location to make a queenless fly back split. If you can find the queen put her in as they will draw comb better. Later that day (when all grumpy foragers are orienting to old location) split the other boxes and requeen, or newspaper combine them with other hives....
I've never had a hive I felt needed to be removed "over night." Good luck and let us know what you do.
 

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I just watched a video of a beekeeper in NJ that euthanized a VERY HIT hive; I mean aggressive. He taped it up at night and put a screen on top in place of the inner cover. Next day he poured diary water through the screen seam by seam into the hive. He used about a cup of liquid soap per gallon of water (2 gallons) on two deep and 2 supers. I will try and post the link. He said he would rinse everything off with a hose when done.

Here it is https://youtu.be/O4ldpyIE5t4
I can't get over this guy, he had 500 subscribers before this video, I just requeened my mean hive and took them somewhere else for 2 months, they are fine now.
 

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Hives become aggressive when honey supers are removed. They just lost the treasure they spent months to accumulate. They go after beekeeper as the person who stole their treasure. Feed them a gallon of sugar syrup and see whether it will calm them down.
 

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I have killed out very aggressive hives before and will again if I get one.I dont need any aggression in the nucs I sell.New keepers need gentle bees or they will quit keeping.I wait until right at dark when all are inside.I first hit any outside bees with a can of ether.Then the top and bottom with good shots and close them off.The next day they are all dead even the ones under caps.I then give the frames to other hives to clean up and use.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Brian, are you sure it was only 500 total subscribers? I mean, going from 500 to 24.7 K in two weeks is phenomenal. And the video has had well over a million views, wow. Talk about gaining traction.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well, the killing has started. Was hoping they had calmed down but as soon as I opened the door of my house this morning a few came after me. The door is not within sight of hive. Walked toward hive and within 30 feet of hive probably had 50 to 100 on me. Yeah, they have to go.
After getting a late start this morning, decided to go with soapy water and sprayer. My plan was to place wet towel over entrance then take out all outside bees with sprayer. I was thinking after that I could open a crack in towel and spray them as they came out. It doesn't seem like they are that eager to come out. So, I sprayed some ether in there from the bottom board front and back. For you ether experts, what is a good shot or dose of ether. Like how many seconds do you hold the nozzle down for?

Started to rain so I came inside for awhile.

I really hate doing this for many reasons. 1: Safety, don't need people getting attacked. After three days and a small flow still going on, sugar water is not going to calm them. 2: I really wish I could move hive to different location and re-queen but carrying that huge hive up that hill would be impossible. 3: Out of 20 hives, it was one of my best producers. From a swarm in April to drawing out 2 double deeps and 5 supers. I had already took one super off and put it on another hive since this one was getting to tall.
Times like this make me wonder why I took up this hobby a little over five years ago. It is very rewarding but things like this make it so frustrating.
 

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I caught a smallish swarm this year and that colony turned out to be defensive and full of burr combs. But I do not mind their defensive behavior at all as they might carry diluted version of AHB strain from the south. They turned out to be exceptionally defensive against small hive beetles, corralling little beetles all over above the inner cover--so that I can easily crush them with my hive tool. AHB strains tend to produce more honey in the south, as well, I gather. As someone said, if the bees don't sting, everybody would be keeping bees. Never ever treated for mites for the past forty years. I do not wish to live in an environment where bees are kept in an ICU bubble full of I Pee Em, for they cannot survive in nature by themselves. On average it takes about a decade for the bees to figure things out, if you let them bee, an equilibrium between a pest and a host. I belive SHB and bees are getting there now.

Earthboy
 

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Brian, are you sure it was only 500 total subscribers? I mean, going from 500 to 24.7 K in two weeks is phenomenal. And the video has had well over a million views, wow. Talk about gaining traction.
Not positive, but I remember his channel, I have subbed to every channel there is at some time or another. I have been checking and it goes up a few thousand every other day.
 

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What can you expect out of 30 to 40 thousand pissed off females. One is enough after 44 years. ;)

I live north of Houston and we have the Ab around here and my hives are like the ones I had in the 70 and 80 just normal for the time back then. After that first year there "went" working bees with just a hood. I grew up with bees like that but not follow you back to the house mean.


I had that problem last year for a while They would come 60 yards to the house after working them 50-100 all pissed off. They swarmed and there went the problem. Why the fall before they were fairly calm and the change?

Do you have a friend with some land you could move them to till you could split and requeen till they calm down? You hate to kill a hive if you can split and requeen or just requeen. It will not take long for summer bees to recycle.

I see you have multiple hives.
If you have some weak hives could you take and kill the mean queen and shake some bees and put the frames and boxes on different weak hives? Being split up might calm them down with other bees till they die over the next two month and you could use the frames to strengthen the weak hives.

You could kill the queen and use the newspaper to combine another weak hive with this but I gives you a weak queen?? in this box.

Shake them out and spray and move the boxes to the other hives.

Lot of alternatives. Let me know how you do.

Luck with the problem.
 

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Not positive, but I remember his channel, I have subbed to every channel there is at some time or another. I have been checking and it goes up a few thousand every other day.
That is Kevin Inglin. He lives in New Jersey. He is an EAS Master Beekeeper and has a long-running podcast (over 10 years) called the Beekeeper's Corner. His last couple of podcasts talk about the experience with this hive and why he elected to euthanize instead of just requeening. He also talks about how this last video has gone off-the-charts viral.
 

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What can you expect out of 30 to 40 thousand pissed off females. One is enough after 44 years. ;)

I live north of Houston and we have the Ab around here and my hives are like the ones I had in the 70 and 80 just normal for the time back then. After that first year there "went" working bees with just a hood. I grew up with bees like that but not follow you back to the house mean.


I had that problem last year for a while They would come 60 yards to the house after working them 50-100 all pissed off. They swarmed and there went the problem. Why the fall before they were fairly calm and the change?

Do you have a friend with some land you could move them to till you could split and requeen till they calm down? You hate to kill a hive if you can split and requeen or just requeen. It will not take long for summer bees to recycle.

I see you have multiple hives.
If you have some weak hives could you take and kill the mean queen and shake some bees and put the frames and boxes on different weak hives? Being split up might calm them down with other bees till they die over the next two month and you could use the frames to strengthen the weak hives.

You could kill the queen and use the newspaper to combine another weak hive with this but I gives you a weak queen?? in this box.

Shake them out and spray and move the boxes to the other hives.

Lot of alternatives. Let me know how you do.

Luck with the problem.

Remembering what happened to the domestication of foxes in Russia, it appears that aggressive trait is not a single-standing genetic trait at all as genetic traits do come clustered with other traits; thus, my thinking is that aggressive trait is packaged, genetically speaking, with "flying in cold or wet weather," for example. AFB in South America seems to produce more honey, requires no treatment, yet is hard to handle. Given these clusters of genetics, I have never killed a hot hive. Rather I place them right behind my back door through which a bugler once broke into my home. You win some and lose some.
 

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Kevin's hive was in his yard at home and he was having problems with them going after his animals, family and guests. That is why he felt he could not wait for the requeening process to calm down the hive. I keep all of my hives in remote, rural fields. So I kind of like the occasional hot hive to keep humans and animals away.
 
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