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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My wife has multiple holes is her veil, we have patched it multiple times, she loves her hat and bee suit so we want to try to replace the veil material. I have searched online with little success, looking for what kind of material and where to buy it. Most folks on DIY veils use Tulle but say it is not very tough. Also found some folks use some sort of nylon mesh, not sue where to buy it. Window screen is out, she likes a soft material so when she removes the veil it lays on her back between bee yards in the truck. I have not talked to any bee supply shops to see if they sell just the material. Any information would be great. Thanks
 

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If you bought your suit from Mann Lake, I know you can call them and get a replacement sent for $30 plus shipping. (You will not see the replacement information in the Mann lake catalog. You need to call customer service.
 

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Try Jo-Anns fabric supply. They sell similar netting, but I have had problems with it being more glare-y, even the so-called matte varieties. My solution, because I am a seamstress, was to move the panels around on the garment, and put the Jo-Anns netting on the sides and keep the best stuff for the front section.

I am on a constant hunt for good veil material. I had a source for real silk veiling, the kind used in very expensive custom millinery shops in France for the creation of mourning veils. I had a sample, but didn't order right away and then when I tried to place an order, the shop was closed.

For many brands of suits, you can buy a replacement veil/hat arrangement. But if the design has changed the zips may not mate up properly. In that case you buy just the veil/hat portion and then cannibalize the new piece to replace the netting on the old one.

If all else fails, you could use very fine thread to make a darn over the hole. I did that for my mentor who has BJ Sheriff suits. The veiling on those used to a simple heat-set, over/under weave. So I could tie-in at the intersection and bridge the broken threads.

For expensive, and presumably hard-working garments that they are, bee jackets and suits are not very well thought-out regarding repairs and maintenance, IMO.

Nancy
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks Nancy, we are going to Jo-Anns tomorrow. Do you recommend any material to patch a cotton/polly bee suit from Jo-anns?I read about a material called diagonal but could not find anything on it.
 

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I am on a constant hunt for good veil material.
What about window screen? Seems like they have some of the same objectives as beekeepers (toughness, anti-glare). There are many types of window screen available for cheap. I don't sew, nor have I ever attempted to replace a veil, but it just seems like the Black Fiberglass Screen Mesh available at Lowes, Home Depot might work.
 

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What about window screen?
Ferg: Window screen is out, she likes a soft material so when she removes the veil it lays on her back between bee yards in the truck.
However, cheap window screen ex. Ebay, ex. China, is made from a kind of nylon material and is very soft. They use this same material to make dirt cheap fishing nets/ keep nets/ prawn traps etc. - which are RUBBISH for that purpose, but it does make an excellent veil.
https://www.beesource.com/forums/showthread.php?344321-pith-helet-and-vail post #4
LJ
 

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Ferg,

The material described as "diagonal" probably just means it is what is called a twill. Look closely at your favorite blue jeans - denim is also a twill, meaning that instead of a simple, grid-like, over-under a single thread at a time pattern, it is a combination of over/under but a couple of threads to one side at a time. So the fabric has the look of a series of diagonal lines on front the surface. This makes for a more tear-resistant fabric as more than single thread must break before a rip starts.

Jo-Anns will have lots of options for patching fabric. Suggest you take the recently-washed garment there so the sales clerks can suggest a similar fabric weave and weight.

You can make flat patches over any holes: Cut piece bigger than the hole, so you can turn an edge under all around the patch. Pin it down over the hole, and sew all around close to the edge of the patch, from the front side of the garment. I'd use a double line of stitching, (see the inseam of your jeans for an example of double stitching.) Wash the patch material, before making the patches, to shrink it.

For what is called a "three corner tear," (this is a two-sided, around a right angle rip where the fabric is still there, even if a bit frayed from being washed), if you have a sewing machine, you can put the patch material underneath the rip and then use the buttonhole setting to make a narrow (1/4 inch or less) line of overstitching along and bridging-over the tear itself, going slightly beyond the ends of the torn lines for reinforcement. The same sort of thing can also be down over very small punctures.

When choosing the veiling fabrics (located in the bridal, fancy party dress area of the store) I found it useful to ask to take the bolts of fabric outside on the sidewalk to look through them in the sun as if you were looking to see eggs. Dark grey may be more useful than flat black, if you can find it.

None of these repairs are technically difficult, but if you haven't got a machine, or need help, any seamstress could easily do this, and not for a lot of expense. It would make a very nice change from hemming pants and letting out waist bands. Just be sure the garment is freshly washed. What we tolerate in bee clothing would gross out a tailor and maybe gum-up her machine.

Nancy
 

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...I had a source for real silk veiling, the kind used in very expensive custom millinery shops in France for the creation of mourning veils. ...
Nancy
For the sake of historic interest, I guess that material was called crape (or crepe), and due to chemicals used to dye it, it was known to kill a few people.

“Many a woman has been laid in her coffin by the wearing of crape,” - Doctor, 1898
 
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