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I am making some plans for mite treatment while the Snelgrove boards are in place - figuring that will likely be needed though I haven't yet tested for mites. Anyone have a brilliant solution for this? The bottom section, below Snelgrove, is not a problem as it's almost completely brood free early on. The top, where all (almost all) the brood was placed, will need treating. I don't think an OAV from the bottom is going to work; the OA would have to travel through the bottom box, supers, Snelgrove screens, and on its way is likely to crystallize out before reaching the areas that most need the treatment. But the Snelgrove door is not large enough to accomodate a Varrox, which is what I have. I don't know - maybe Formic Pro would be the only other option when it warms up a bit.
 

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...maybe Formic Pro would be the only other option when it warms up a bit.
Formic has max/min volume requirements. Too much space may reduce effectiveness. Too little space may result in bee kill.

Some type of strip placed in the brood area, which the bees have to come into contact with [to be effective] might be better.

Or, perhaps, an OA dribble.
 

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82 colonies +/- mostly Langstroth mediums, a few deeps for nuc production
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If you are going to plan on this you should make a shim 2-3 inches deep with a notch on the bottom on one end so you can insert the vaporizer wand.
You should make the top solid or use the inner cover with the hole and vent blocked or turn your telescoping cover upside down.
Point being seal the top so the OA stays in the area you want to treat. Lots of folks treat top down.
The depth of the shim is to prevent the OA from recrystalizing on the relatively cool surface as soon as it leaves the vaporizer pan. Be careful to not scorch your topbars.
 
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