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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi i think i have mites in my hive :eek: i saw two of them :cry: i have heard that when you split your hive and let the bees make a new queen that the mites don't have any pupa to do what ever they do so they get to old to mate and repreduce more mites thus you hive is free of mites :applause:


is that true :scratch:
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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Re: Varroa mites

Varroa mites reproduce in the capped brood. Any hive that has had a laying queen for 9 days during the time of year that brood rearing takes place will have capped brood for the Varroa to reproduce in.

There are many things that will affect the Varroa's ability to reproduce. Shorter capping and post capping times, a break in the brood cycle (which a walk away split would create while they raise a new queen) etc.

Here's some info:
http://www.bushfarms.com/beespests.htm#varroa
http://www.bushfarms.com/beesvarroatreatments.htm
http://www.bushfarms.com/beesnaturalcell.htm

There is much more on the life cycle of the Varroa available on the web if you search Google for it. Try a search on it's current name: "Varroa destructor" and it's previous name: "Varroa jacobsoni"
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Re: verona mites

thanks for the imformation i have another question if you split the hive would it get rid of all the mites in the half that did not have the queen
 

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Re: verona mites

Welcome Beginning Beekeeper,

You have found an extremely informative source to guide your bee keeping endevours. Your timing is ust about right... it's winter and the hive(s) are in their quiet ( read that to mean survival mode)time of the year.
Take this time and read as much about the lives of bees. Join a bee club and find a mentor. A club and/or mentor will guide you in your quest for honey.

You will also find this forum a priceless source of information. Read all you can, have fun and enjoy a hobby that will reward you handsomely.
Good luck:)
 

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if you split the hive would it get rid of all the mites in the half that did not have the queen

Nope!
Zip!
and NOOOO!

You will need to understand and apply IPM.
I use to think that making a divide would slow down the Varroa.
The phoretic stage of the mite is the one that needs to be knocked down as well as the stages within the cell.
Good luck and do consider using registered mite control like Apiguard.
Ernie
 

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>if you split the hive would it get rid of all the mites in the half that did not have the queen.

The Varroa has two states it can live in. Phoretic (outside of the cells) and in the capped cells. The ones on the bees outside the cells can suck the blood of the bees and survive even if they can't reproduce until there is brood to get in. They can survive for months this way even without a queen or brood.
 

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I was heartbroken when the PA bee inspector found mites in my hive. Then I learned the pests are now a part of our existence.

Last year I stole all my queens into nuc as a swarm control method. They didn't swarm. The year was lousy for me and other area keepers due to rain and cool temperatures (?). Unfortunately no one told the mites that I interrupted the brood cycle. By end of summer my mite counts were high and one hive was through the roof.

I do a sugar roll to gauge mite populations and treat with formic acid pads based on the counts. Not what I like, but I haven't pursued another option yet.

The hardest part is finding #8 hardware cloth. Most home and hardware stores carry it in 20' lengths. Hard to justify when you only need a piece 3" round.

If you can't find a piece, drop me a line and I'll send you one with instructions.
 
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