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I have just started to read up on treatments for V Mites..........
Lots of choices make it harder to choose.

I want a treatment I can use now in the hot weather that wont kill my bees or queen....
I want a treatment that will work on adult bees as well as brood or emerging brood...
I am leaning towards a natural treatment..

I plan on treating in the next few weeks...... I have honey supers on ,but do not plan to take any honey from the bees....
My 2 hives only got started this spring. So I will let them keep all there stores for the fall.....

Any good suggestions???? Before anyone mentions Oxy vapor. I don't want to have to buy 200 bucks worth of stuff to treat,. So that's out!
 

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Funny you'd mention the OA treatment being so costly. There is an alternative to the costliness. Cheaper as well. I was sent a PM by WWW on here showing how he used OA without paying the expense the first two years for the vaporizer. He created a shim for the top of the hive, then put plexy over it. The shim had a small hole the size of a pipe that he used. Great info in it.. Here's the youtube video..

It's the way I plan to do mine this year.
 

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Before anyone mentions Oxy vapor. I don't want to have to buy 200 bucks worth of stuff to treat,. So that's out!
$200? You can buy an OA vaporizer much cheaper. The OA itself is what $8 for 12 oz.. You use one gram per brood chamber, that's what, 10 cents? It does not harm brood, queen or bees and you can use it above 40f.

So for about $150, you have a proven mite kill system that'll last you years and cost you far less than other treatments.......
 

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I'll probably use the system my mentor uses: 50 ml of 50% formic acid on a paper towel pad, placed on top of frames. My mentor props the top cover open for extra ventilation, and puts a screened separator under the cover (I guess to stop robbing). This is stronger that the MiteAway formic acid treatment, and should get the job done in 24 hours. There have been some university studies on it and there are a lot of examples to be found on line.

Formic acid is the simplest organic acid, and vaporizes all by itself.

Needed materials are:

~50% formic acid solution
Paper towels
A 50-60 cc syringe
Screened separator (an empty quilt box, spacer with screen on it, double-screen board ...)

The home biofuel making uses formic acid, and 90% solution can be had for about $12/liter, enough to make close to 40 treatments (you dilute 50:50 with water to get a little less than 50% solution).

Syringe: local ag supplier.

Depending on what you have on hand, you could probably get change back from a $20, or maybe you need to put together some screened spacers.

Or go the approved route and use Mite Away II pads.

Formic acid has been accepted in the US longer than OA.
 

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Phoebee,
Is a single pad 50 ml treatment for a 2 deep brood box hive? Thanks for sharing your knowledge on the subject as I have been looking for a simple to do procedure for treating with Formic. The OAV treatments are working great however I have always wanted to give Formic a try. These organic acids are fantastic for killing mites :).
 

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The European system for Formic Acid uses a reservoir and wick of filter paper. The cool thing about this system is the wick of paper is cut with scissors to match the exact temperature and broodnest size. The metering is much more precise than in the American pad system.

The technology is obviously carefully calibrated, but with a little care a similar system could be home-built.



 

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I'll probably use the system my mentor uses: 50 ml of 50% formic acid on a paper towel pad, placed on top of frames. My mentor props the top cover open for extra ventilation, and puts a screened separator under the cover (I guess to stop robbing). This is stronger that the MiteAway formic acid treatment, and should get the job done in 24 hours. There have been some university studies on it and there are a lot of examples to be found on line.

Formic acid is the simplest organic acid, and vaporizes all by itself.

Needed materials are:

~50% formic acid solution
Paper towels
A 50-60 cc syringe
Screened separator (an empty quilt box, spacer with screen on it, double-screen board ...)

The home biofuel making uses formic acid, and 90% solution can be had for about $12/liter, enough to make close to 40 treatments (you dilute 50:50 with water to get a little less than 50% solution).

Syringe: local ag supplier.

Depending on what you have on hand, you could probably get change back from a $20, or maybe you need to put together some screened spacers.

Or go the approved route and use Mite Away II pads.

Formic acid has been accepted in the US longer than OA.
Doesn't the daytime temperature need to stay below 85 degrees when using Formic Acid?

OP said he wanted a treatment he could use in hot weather.
 

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Phoebee,
Is a single pad 50 ml treatment for a 2 deep brood box hive? Thanks for sharing your knowledge on the subject as I have been looking for a simple to do procedure for treating with Formic. The OAV treatments are working great however I have always wanted to give Formic a try. These organic acids are fantastic for killing mites :).
Our mentor's method was probably passed on word of mouth ... exact provenance is unknown. Best to go to the source. West Virginia University has several papers out on their formic acid fumigator method, which is similar but seems to use slightly different (but simple) equipment and perhaps less emphasis on ventilation. They've got hard data I can't offer. This is a paper they did on a SARE grant but you can find others.

http://www.wvu.edu/~agexten/varroa/FormicAcid.pdf

Forum participant "Challenger" revealed his source for formic acid at reasonable prices:

http://www.dudadiesel.com/choose_item.php?id=formic

According to the paper above, the temperature where the formic acid vaporizes is regulated by the bees to about 92 F, which should work so long as the outside air temperature is enough lower that the bees can control it.
 

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Read the source info. Think about different hive volumes, 8 vs 10 frame, medium vs deep. The paper talks about quantities for single, single +medium and double deep. Do the math on volume, its not a straight line. Base dose to get the vapor concentration some additional to maintain it over the treatment time in the extra volume. One key part is to measure varroa levels before and after. Use data to adjust quantity or ventilation. Less is better than too much. Pay attention to the dangers of handling FA. Skin contact and breathing vapors are BAD.
 

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It seems one would need to be very careful with applying Formic since there are so many variables, All the good advice and info given above convinces me that OAV is pretty much fool proof, I will just stay with the OAV method of mite control :).
 

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.... All the good advice and info given above convinces me that OAV is pretty much fool proof, I will just stay with the OAV method of mite control .
It pretty much is......Even Michael Bush contemplated using it at one time. Just don't get so excited that you forget to wear adequate protection!!!
 

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>Even Michael Bush contemplated using it at one time.

I used it one year on some of the hives to measure the effectiveness of not only the OA but FGMO and small cell. I treated three times with the OA on the hives that I treated. I think that was 2002 or 2003. It looked like the OA vapor was killing between 90 and 95% of the Varroa and subsequent treatments would take 90 to 95% of what remained... I really didn't know so much about the microbes at that time...
 

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I really didn't know so much about the microbes at that time...
Does this imply that the treatment may adversely effect the microbes in the hive or are you eluding to something else? I too am trying to make a treatment decision and having trouble deciding which would be the best, lest harmfull and effective
 

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I'm guessing there are many people, new to beekeeping this year, who are agonizing over treatment decisions right now. Toto, i've a feeling we're not in Kansas anymore.

Pinchecharlie, i'm in the same boat. I've been sugar dusting while researching the various options ... let us know what you decide!
 

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Needed materials are:

~50% formic acid solution
Paper towels
A 50-60 cc syringe
Screened separator (an empty quilt box, spacer with screen on it, double-screen board ...)

The home biofuel making uses formic acid, and 90% solution can be had for about $12/liter, enough to make close to 40 treatments (you dilute 50:50 with water to get a little less than 50% solution).

Syringe: local ag supplier.
Don't forget the goggles, good rubber gloves (one pin hole can mean a bad burn), protective clothing, plenty of fresh water and a first aid kit. Formic is really nasty stuff that can cause serious burns or blindness if splashed in your eye. I used it for one year then switched to OA.
 

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I admittedly don't know much about microbes in the hive, I have never seen a study on this subject and my hives always respond positively to the OAV treatments. Surely if microbes were affected to whatever degree wouldn't they bounce back. If anyone has material that can be posted about this subject I would love to read it :).
 

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Here is a treatment for mite I have been using that I got from the fatbeeman

mix 1/2 teaspoon of red thyme oil and 16 oz of mineral oil and place a paper towel on the top bar of the hive then squirt some of the red thyme and mineral oil on the paper towel in a s shape just to wet the towel good
 

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In some areas and some strains of bees probably don't need anything extremely efficient to keep the mites below economic or lethal thresholds. Some other combinations of bees, climate, location etc., seem to need proactive treatment with proven effective methods. Mite treatment coming into the fall may be do or die. If you miss the window of opportunity dithering or experimenting......................!
 
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