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Hi!

I just got into beekeeping and bought/installed my bee package on the 12th of April into a completely new hive. I understand you have to expect varroa mites eventually and will have to treat, I didn't expect to see one so soon however. I saw one on my inspection board today and am wondering if/when I should treat. If I do treat I plan on using MAQS but I know that has some brood loss, and this being a fresh package I don't want to do it so soon. I plan on adding a second brood box in 2-3 weeks as well.
 

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Welcome to the forum. The mites came with your bees at no extra charge. If you have the equipment, right before they cap the brood cells would be a good time to treat them with OAV. You could do a dribble with more easily obtainable and far less expensive equipment. This should be done before cappings too. If you did it now, you will start them out at a very low count which will give you time to decide on your next treatment. There are other options since you do not have supers on. Lots of info here on treatments. Don't wait too long. Do a mite count and see where you are if you want to wait. J
 

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MAQS have a temperature range restriction. Make sure you will be inside the temperature range for the full treatment period.
 

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It's hard to recommend a course of action after seeing a single mite on your bottom board--this would not normally be cause for alarm. If your supplier was doing their job, the mite count should be very low right now, so your bees wouldn't require treatment.

But if you want peace of mind, the only way to know for sure is to test them. As a new beekeeper, it's a good idea to learn how to test your bees and determine their mite load. Search Google or this forum to learn about the sugar shake and alcohol wash mite test methods. With a new package I'd recommend a sugar shake, because you probably don't have a lot of bees to spare.

If you do test them and find they've got a dangerously high mite count, I'd let the supplier know that you're not thrilled that you were sold mite-heavy bees. But again, seeing a single mite is not necessarily cause for alarm, and you'll get used to seeing mites on your inspection boards all the time. That's why having a testing protocol is so important.
 

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Hi!

I just got into beekeeping and bought/installed my bee package on the 12th of April into a completely new hive. I understand you have to expect varroa mites eventually and will have to treat, I didn't expect to see one so soon however. I saw one on my inspection board today and am wondering if/when I should treat. If I do treat I plan on using MAQS but I know that has some brood loss, and this being a fresh package I don't want to do it so soon. I plan on adding a second brood box in 2-3 weeks as well.
I would try Apivar. Put it in and forget about for 42 days.
 

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MAQS have a temperature range restriction. Make sure you will be inside the temperature range for the full treatment period.
I don't have the label in front of me, but i am pretty sure the temperature restriction is for the first three days.

I would use OAV regardless.
 
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