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Will female mites die if they cannot lay eggs when you have a break in brood raising? Don't they start laying again as soon as the queen resumes egg laying?
 

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I don't know the answer to that for sure. I was thinking if there were not eggs being laid for the Varroa to reproduce in they just stay on the adult bees. I do know that the brood break allows for not as many new varroa mites emerging, because of not being able to reproduce during the time of no brood. I don't know how long the little pests can live. It is just our luck they probably live for quite a while.
 

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Will female mites die if they cannot lay eggs when you have a break in brood raising? Don't they start laying again as soon as the queen resumes egg laying?
No, the female mites can live in the hive (on the bees) for several month. As soon as the colony starts breeding, the mites starts breeding too.
Maximal 2 young mites coming with her mother out of a bee cell and up to 4 young mites out of a drone cell. If two or more adult mites breeding in on cell you can easy calculate how many mites might hatch from a cell.
If you have a brood break and no closed cells in the hive, one OA evaporation will kill close to 100% of the mites. A brood break and still sealed brood in the hive is a protection for the mites, OA can't penetrate wax and will not kill the mites in closed cells.
Drones travel up to 40 km from one hive to another and the mites travel with them. There is always a high re infection during summer.
 

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Drones travel up to 40 km from one hive to another and the mites travel with them. There is always a high re infection during summer.
This line just answered a question I had. How was it possible for bees from one colony to infect another with Varroa because when ever I observed workers foraging they rarely make contact with other bees. In the 2 packages we installed in April, on our first inspection I found no drones and no drone cells. True I may have missed a few that came with the packages, but there were not too many bees and I believe there were none. During our 2nd inspection I found Drones in both hives. Baffled by this I asked a senior beekeeper where these Drones could have come from and if it was possible for Drones to enter strange hives. He said that "Drones go where they want." This could be the reason that Varroa prefer Drone brood, not because of cell size but because by infecting Drones it increases their odds of reproducing by being introduced to healthy hives previously uninfected with Varroa.
Colino
 
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