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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In the past I froze all my extracted frames and then stored in the basement next to a dehumidifier. We're tight on room down there and I tried using the garage. No good. Wax moths made fast work of getting into those frames and now I have a couple frames with moth spindles/poop etc. I cleared out the deep freezer/wrapped those frames in bags and put them in.

Question: after frozen for a few days, can I simply take them out, store like I did previously in the basement and then when needed put them back in to the hive, moth crap and all, for the bees to clean out? Or- are these frames goners and should I just replace with fresh foundation?

thanks,

brad
 

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Question: after frozen for a few days, can I simply take them out, store like I did previously in the basement and then when needed put them back in to the hive, moth crap and all, for the bees to clean out? Or- are these frames goners and should I just replace with fresh foundation?
Hi Brad. Don’t replace the frames. The bees will clean everything for you. Let them take care of it. I assume moths and other insects can’t get into the basement. If that’s correct, you should be okay to store there. I would probably let the bees clean them first and then store.

I know you didn’t ask, but just so you know...I usually store them in my barn by stacking 3 high, then a piece of paper on top of the third one’s frames and moth crystals on top of the paper. Then you can stack another 3 on top of that with a board on top as a lid. You have to check about once a month to see if the moth crystals have dwindled. Something like this:

Top board (or makeshift plywood lid)
Moth crystals (2 tbs)
Index card or paper
Super
Super
Super
Moth crystals (2 tbs)
Index card or paper
Super
Super
Super
Flat Floor

Hope this helps!

Ryan
 

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I freeze all of our frames in our chest freezer, it hits around -20, leave them in for 2-3 days, the freezer holds a lot, around 50 ish.

I pull them out, put in the honey super, stack up in our basement and then cover the top box with door screening. Been doing this for years now.

I have also stored in plastic tubs. But if stored in them I let the frames warm up and dry any freezer moisture. Then put the lid on the tub. Most are in the honey supers, in the spring ready to be put back on the hives.
 

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You’re very welcome. Just don’t let the crystals run out. When you’re ready to put the supers back on next spring or whenever, let the supers air out for a while to get rid of the moth crystal gas before you put back onto the hives.

Ryan
 

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OK, fish -- I'm sort of on a crusade here this a.m., so .... I'll continue, for now: per folks with lots more experience than I, freezing doesn't kill wax moth eggs. As far as I can tell, it zaps the adult moths and the maggots, but the eggs probably have a bio-provided antifreeze. I've put lots of once-maggot-riddled frames into freezers (deep-freeze, not just kitchen type) for 5-6 weeks, and once out and in storage bins at room temp (and inaccessible to moths, I believe), suddenly there're maggots and cocoons.

This time, I'm freezing the frames to kill SHBs and their spawn-of-hell, then I spray the foundations/frames with Bt-k, then I use paradiclorobenzene balls. If that combination doesn't work, well, I think I'll just toss the frames, foundations and all, and start fresh.

Speaking of which .... I've bought wax-coated foundation in the past, stored it (unwrapped), and then found moth webs and SHB maggots on them. Crazy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
thanks all, this is great stuff

I was wondering about my foundation-- most of it in frames I've already coated w wax. I didn't see evidence of moths on those but it makes sense they'd check it out for sure.

Mlanden- what is Bt-k?

Well, for now I'll freeze for a few days, stack in the basement near the dehumidifier and use crystals as described and see how it goes. Hopefully no larvae (my wife is really happy that I'm watching for larval growth in our basement).

By the way-- even though I checked "instant email notification" on this post I'm not getting them. Has anyone else had this issue?
 

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BT-K is bacillus thuringiensis, variety "kurstak" which is the variety of BT usually sold in most hardware and garden stores. It is not the variety of BT that should be used as a wax worm preventative on comb. The variety that targets wax worms is "aizawa". It is sold under the brand name of Xentari. Also be aware that this is a living organism with a definate shelf life.
 

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BT is VERY effective if it's not old. I use it every year for all my comb. I don't worry much about wax foundation although sometimes they'll get in there as well. For me, it's the best option. Too much to freeze, etc. Spray, stack and done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
ok- thanks. Glad that's clarified-- because googling "BTK" gave concerning results!

I'll check that out. For now I got the flakes and I'll stack/plate of flakes as described. Thanks all, appreciate the help
 

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OK, fish -- I'm sort of on a crusade here this a.m., so .... I'll continue, for now: per folks with lots more experience than I, freezing doesn't kill wax moth eggs. As far as I can tell, it zaps the adult moths and the maggots, but the eggs probably have a bio-provided antifreeze. I've put lots of once-maggot-riddled frames into freezers (deep-freeze, not just kitchen type) for 5-6 weeks, and once out and in storage bins at room temp (and inaccessible to moths, I believe), suddenly there're maggots and cocoons.

This time, I'm freezing the frames to kill SHBs and their spawn-of-hell, then I spray the foundations/frames with Bt-k, then I use paradiclorobenzene balls. If that combination doesn't work, well, I think I'll just toss the frames, foundations and all, and start fresh.

Speaking of which .... I've bought wax-coated foundation in the past, stored it (unwrapped), and then found moth webs and SHB maggots on them. Crazy.
I wonder and would guess, if you froze the frames for a week, then thawed then for a week, then froze them again, would that end the life cycle?
At what point does an egg "decide" to hatch?
 

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I wonder and would guess, if you froze the frames for a week, then thawed then for a week, then froze them again, would that end the life cycle?
At what point does an egg "decide" to hatch?
Interesting point, R -- maybe the sequence could metabolically confuse the eggs? That tactic has been shown to work under other circumstances and species; no idea re: moth eggs .....
 
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