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My wife and I are trying to use less processed sugar in our diets. It is a multi-pronged approach, part of which is substitution of honey for white sugar when a sugar is "required" for a recipe. For example, there are some really nice brownies in the kitchen that were made with honey instead or white sugar.

This got me wondering - is cut comb a useful part of this effort? Not in the sense of trying new things that entail cut comb (I really don't need more sugar-laden foods in my life), but can cut comb be a better substitute for processed sugars in certain recipes?

I am thinking of granola, which we make with honey - would comb possibly make a better granola, perhaps one that would clump better? Or could the wax component possibly make an equal or better bread than one made with white sugar or honey? (We don't use sugar in most breads, just talking "for example.")

I think it is worthy of experiment, but am curious if anyone has experience or resources along these lines. Also, any input on the "healthiness" of using cut comb in this way would be interesting.
 

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The sugar in honey is the same as other sugars; its simply inverted sucrose. In other words, its the same thing (just pre-converted for you) that you would absorb after eating table sugar, and for that matter, is little different in sugar content & composition than high fructose corn sugar. Swapping other sugars out for honey doesn't achieve much in terms of reducing calories, decreasing blood sugar spikes, etc. It just tasted better.

As for wax, its edible but your body doesn't really break it down - i.e. you're not going to gain any calories or other significant nutrient from it. So you can include it in recipes, although I'm not sure what its effects will be in terms of factors like texture or how well your granola bars will hold together. I think your biggest issue will be getting it to incorporate into foods, especially if you cannot heat the food above the wax's melting temperature.

Personally, I like to eat cut comb (essentially, its candy), and we sometimes crumble it onto salads to give some sweetness and texture (small pieces are almost like adding dried fruit - chewy and sweet).
 
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