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I have some dead outs from this winter that were on deep frames. I am switching over to all 8 frame medium equipment. I am getting two packages of bees and I thought I would give them a head start by cutting down the deep frames of drawn comb to medium. I've done one super for each package so far. It is slow going cutting them down, since they were on wired foundation and I have to find the wires buried in the comb and cut them. I inevitably damage some of the comb in the process, and it wasn't perfect to begin with (I did cherry pick the frames, so I only took the better looking ones).

What I'm wondering is if the damaged comb will be repaired by the bees, or if it will cause an excess of drone brood? I am wanting to go foundationless later. I have thought about alternating drawn comb with empty frames in the second hive body. Depending on how they do will guide me from there. I want four mediums to a hive before I take off honey, since we normally run two deeps for brood chambers here. Any thoughts or suggestions would be welcome.
 

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Yes they will repair the damage. As for drone it shouldn't cause excessive amounts. Your plan for going foundation less is a sound plan. I would set my first box up with three or four drawn frames in the center. Then alternate foundation less and drawn to fill the box. The next box would be set up as you have described when they need it. You can use four med for your brood chamber if you wish. Just keep in mind three med are the equivalent of two deeps.
 

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http://www.zorotools.com/g/00059421...pid=G1219364&gclid=CKLr9fbS-70CFe9QOgodKDoAZQ


If you use a hot wire you can cut the comb to each wire and go around the perimeter of the bottom of the frame is the same manner. Taking a normal soldering gun (Weller) and extending the wire with #10 copper will cool down the wire so it doesn't burn so bad. Wattage will make a difference so you might have to experiment with the length. Once you have cut a path and found the wires you can snip them off, cut the end bars and add a bottom bar if you like. The bees will attach the comb.
 

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Huh?

I can't imagine what advantage a 'soldering gun' offers over a sharp knife in cutting comb. :scratch: :s

Either way you still have to use a different tool to cut the foundation wires! And with a knife there is no concern about "so it doesn't burn so bad."
:lpf:
 

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Running them thru a table saw slowly results in a clean cut. Cleanup of the tablesaw uses up the saved time unless they were dry of honey. When all you have is a soldering iron, everything looks like it should be welded.
 

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I just converted dozens in the past month. I found a coping saw to be easy and effective. I cut the wood sides first, then used a serrated knife to cut the comb 1/4 to. 1/2 inch up from the bottom where you cut the sides. Then I set the bottom bar on the edge of the bench, grab the coping saw again and cut straight down thru the bottom bars along the inside of what was the side. This shortens the bottom bar by the thickness if the sidebars so it can be re attached inside the sides. Cut or pull the bottom few inches of comb off the bottom bar. Hold it between the sides, glue the fresh cut end and shoot a staple thru the side into to bottom bar. Done in less than two minutes and three sides of your comb are still attached.
 

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Huh?

I can't imagine what advantage a 'soldering gun' offers over a sharp knife in cutting comb. :scratch: :s
You probably wouldn't see the advantage of an electrical surgical pencil either because you are not a surgeon.
 

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I cut down a bunch of deeps to mediums and found that using a dremel with one of those thin cut-off discs works well to zip through the wire reinforcements. The intervening foundation/comb can be easily cut with a Stanley knife, although you can also just keep going right across with the dremel. It gets a bit messy if there are cells with contents being cut through, but nothing a beekeeper has not seen before....

Rob
 

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You probably wouldn't see the advantage of an electrical surgical pencil either because you are not a surgeon.
You are right - for once:rolleyes: - I don't see any 'advantage of an electrical surgical pencil' in cutting wax comb. Are you going to enlighten us? :scratch:
 

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Wax is non conductive it wouldn't work very well but a hot wire will.
 

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Ace, there are 9 vertical wires in typical wired foundation. Neither a 'soldering gun' jerry-rigged to have a 'hot wire', nor a 'surgeon's pencil' is going to help cutting those wires.

Why don't you just admit that Rob Hughes (post #9) has the better solution :thumbsup::thumbsup: with a Dremel tool fitted with a cutoff disk?


:lpf:
 

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I don't have the advantages of a civil engineering degree and have to just rely on real world experience. Now someone who does not know how to use a table saw would not want to attempt jamming a wired frame thru with a dull blade and little understanding of speed and torque. With my well maintained saw and my rational experienced judgement, I have cut down deep frames with my table saw. The fact that some choose not to attempt this probably is wise for them. As Clint Eastwood said, A man just has to understand his limitations.
 

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Tin snips or kitchen shears work great where you have wired foundation. Just play dumb when your wife asks where the kitchen shears went the next time a chicken needs yo be cut up. Lol
 
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