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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am going tomorrow to look and p/u 3 hives that have been abandon for a few years.
1. What should I do to clean my tools after looking at them/moving them?
2. Do I need to clean my suit and gloves?
3. At what point should I bring them home the main yard?


I already am planing to haul to a isolated yard and transition them to new frames and/or boxes. Last thing I want to do is to kill my hives, even though 90% of them are hygienic.

What is worth culling out of the hives as far as the equipment?

Thanks. Any advice would be appreciated.

Mike AKA Kingfisher
 

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ross Conrad wrote an article in bee culture (feb 2009) about how to deal with AFB hives naturally. in his article he was really successful. I would suggest checking it out at least. Good luck.
 

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Do mix your equipment for a year. Sterilize hive tool when transitioning between groups. Do not move bees from one group to the other. Next time, buy new bees and new equipment. That is my opinion.


Roland
 

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I now have 12 hives, I bought a nuc and caught 2 swarms, the rest I have adopted from others as abandoned hives. I have been replacing the hive bodies and any broken frames as needed. Some of them have been honey bound, but all have been surviving on their own for several years. With no chemical treatment or management of any kind, I feel they are healthy and doing very well. So other than a little repair work by me they are good.
 

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If you don't find any disease present I wouldn't worry about cleaning tools, clothes or whatever. Don't bother quarantining them, if no disease.

On the other hand. If you find them diseased, don't take them anywhere. Tell the owner and get the owner to burn them. Abandoned hives are the responsibility of the landowner upon which the hives sit.

Are you confiscating these hives or buying them from the landowner? Who gave you permission to take them?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Went and looked at them today. All were started 3-5 years ago. He treated about 4 years ago w/ terimyacin (sp). Should I just bring them to the home bee yard? They are Italians and ferals. Did not work them but looked good from the outside
sqkcrk- They were from a craigslist ad. Free is good.
They were dadant and homeade boxes(mostly dadant).
What do y'all think?
Thanks
Kingfisher
 

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I know it would be an expense, but I would reccomend placing them very far away from your hives for at least a year. I would reccomend Eastern Kentucky:cool: Congrats on the hives sounds good.
 

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If they were started 4 to 5 years ago & they are doing well today I rather doubt there is a problem.
And if you checked them as you posted, what did you find???
Lot worse things to deal with in the bee business than foul brood now a days!!!
Trust me!!!
 

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My mentor helped me move a hive, and he had some "hive staples" They looked like a regular staple from a staple gun, except the were about 2 inches wide and had 3/4" ends. He used them to join the boxes together and the bottom board. Then we put a couple of nails thru the top to hold it on. This made moving the hives by myself quite easy. I went in after dark, closed the entrance with screen, and used a hand dolly to load them onto a trailer.

Good Luck and Congrats on the find
Tony
 

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Ratchet straps are a lot easier than hive staples.

Johnny
 
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