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So checking on the hive in the backyard today. Sunshine and temps in the 60's. I put out some pollen substitute which the bees are ignoring and they are bringing in whitish/grey pollen from something but can't figure out where. No Maple or pussy willow out yet and no skunk cabbage out either. Any thoughts from you Northerners?
Interestingly enough, I have two hives about ten miles away that are taking the pollen substitute like crazy, go figure.
:s
 

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Last week was the first time this year I noticed them collecting pollen. I don't see anything in bloom but apparently they do. One of my girls took one for the team to satisfy my curiosity, my wife doesn't agree though. Did yours look something like this? It is more whitish creamy looking than in this picture. I had to give her some starter fluid to keep still ;)

B1P9.jpg
 

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Running into the same here, just today noticed a few bees with grey pollen. No idea what, this early in the year. N Illinois. Early year so far after not much of a winter. A very nice change from last year!
 

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We have a large yellow birch tree that the bees work quite a bit for pollen. Not ready here yet.
 

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my girls were packing it in on Monday when it was in the 60s in Skaneateles. I also havent seen anything even budding out where im at yet. They are finding it in bunches somewhere
 

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We have skunk cabbage, silver and red maples, willows coming in (a bit south of Albany NY). Probably others but I can't tell pollen apart. We have had witch hazel blooming (since Jan?) but I don't often see it coming in. My guess from your color is red maple or elm. I am under the impression that elm here blooms after red maple. It could bloom earlier but I have not seen it.... Check warm and wet areas, they often bloom first. There are "always" microclimates the bees find when spring still looks a long way off in my yard....
 

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We don’t have elms up here anymore, I believe Dutch Elm disease took most of them out.
They still occasionally sprout and grow a little before dying here. Pollen, probably not that big.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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We don’t have elms up here anymore, I believe Dutch Elm disease took most of them out.
Thanks to the plant cloning work of tree geneticist, Alden Townsend, the prognosis for Ulmus americana is now good. In the late 1990s, approximately 25 years of work with U. americana came to fruition when the announcement was made that Townsend had succeeded with two new strains: American elm tree clones resistant to Dutch elm disease became a reality.
Named U. americana "Valley Forge" and U. americana "New Harmony," Townsend's clones are now on the market. The plant cloning work of tree geneticists continues in hopes of developing new American elms that will be even more resistant to Dutch elm disease.
Potential for an elm comeback?

Bees here have stopped the dry pollen sub but are still doing a number on the Ultrabee patties in the hives. The 1# patties I put in the hives on March 1st were all but gone yesterday when I checked. And there is no shortage of fresh pollen coming in. Saw a lot of comb packed with pollen (and brood!)
 
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