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I lost all my bees earlier this winter, I got a lot of information, suggestions and advice. all was very helpful

A member here (Tenbears) was to speak a tour bee meeting, and graciously offered to come and go through my hives with me. last week he did so.

One by one we disassembled all the hives. it is so nice to see hands on as you get an explanation of what you are seeing. tell tail indicators suddenly become apparent. so much more concise than trying to understand a written explanation, at least for me.

To make a long story short Tenbears explained that there was no one thing that led to the losses, mite evidence showed some mite load, but felt it was not an all out infestation. he said he was of the opinion that although I has treated for mites, he felt I did so too early in the season. resulting in some mite load rebound. which would have taxed the bees to a degree. resulting in a decline of hatching bees that would be overwintering. that combined with an extremely hard cold winter, and the location of my hives on a hill with northern exposure, and no windbreak. All teamed up to create the demise of my colonies. He said the bees most likely could have survived any one of the problems, most probably could have survived two of them, but all three circumstances were more that they could take.

He offered me a program with timely treatments and management that he felt would help. I also plan to move the hives to a more sheltered area before next winter. and said he would gladly look in on me before next winter.

So I guess I will try a few more colonies and see if I can pull this off.
 

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Wow that is really tough. I am glad you are jumping back in.

I lost all (2) of mine last winter. This winter I went with an all nuc plan in hopes of coming through with two. I'm down to two but they are both looking really good so I am hopeful they do make it.

Are you going to try for any swarms since you have all that drawn comb? Maybe get some acclimated to the area?

I really hope this try works out for you! That was very nice of Tenbears to help.
 

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Sorry to here about your bees. A wind block can make a big difference. I have some hives out on a farm that do not have much of a wind block so I wrap them and reduce the entrance to 3/4 they seem to do okay. I would get bees into you boxes as soon as possible to avoid wax moth damage, good luck.
 

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Glad to see you are goign to hang in there. Expensive way to learn but look at all the things you know not to do now. You have to be thinking ahead and thinking hard. You choose where the bees will be. is it good enough? Nobody but you said that area has enough food to winter on. so does it? You have to watch the bees and understand what they are saying to you about your choices. When you mess up, which you will often. you have to be able to correct those mistakes. Which you usually can.

It is hard to know what is good and what is better until you see it. if everything is poor. it all looks normal. Nothing to see that woudl alarm you. One stand out hive is an exception. A hand full of hives that are faltering in comparison to everything else. That is a problem that should never be ignored.

As you said Tenbears has shown you many more things to watch for. And that is valuable information.
 

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Thank you for posting. It is good to get an experienced, objective look.
Good luck.
 
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