Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,208 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The title pretty much says it all. I have seen photos of a tool that looks like a mini paint roller with small spikes. One rolls it over capped honey and it pockets holes in the cap pings.
Is it efficient when extracting honey by centrifugal force?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,021 Posts
Never used one myself, but others have said before that they don't work very well. I would think that the roller would soon clog up with capping wax and have to be continually cleaned out to function well, just my opinion though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
329 Posts
I bought one but didn't like it. Went back to my Pierce electric knife that has served me well for many years. Yeah, $100 but well worth it.

If you only have a few supers then a cappings scratcher works well. But don't use it as a 'scratcher'. Instead, slide it just under the cappings and lift them off...works great.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,164 Posts
I've used one for the last two years but at the time only had two or three hives that produced a crop of honey and the crop was small, two supers. Like Rube63 said go lightly to keep it from plugging. Now that I have more hives, an electric knife or a planer is on my list of "must haves" for the near future. You'll still need a cappings scratcher for low spots on the comb if you use the roller.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,208 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks...my daughter preferred the scratcher last year...only did about 80 frames.
 

·
Vendor
Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
Joined
·
54,161 Posts
They are useful for fully drawn plastic like HSC and PermaComb. Somewhat useful for low spots, but I find it easier to catch them with the tip of the knife. They clog up easily and you have to either keep it in water (which will water down you honey some) or you have to wash and dry it often. I have several and don't use them. The other thing is, you think it would be convenient to have it the width of the comb. It is not. It's easier to use if you get a narrower one and do several passes because you won't have to press as hard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
I found that you can keep the teeth and spaces between the rows of teeth pretty clean with a chopstick. And it certainly is a LOT less of a mess since you're not cutting anything off the frame. I did about 50 frames with an uncapping roller - and I was fussy about making sure the cells were punctured - but it didn't seem to permit as free flow of honey in the extractor as just simply uncapping with a knife. In other words, it seemed to leave a lot of honey in the frame. When I switched back to uncapping with a knife for the last 2 supers I could tell an immediate difference with how efficient the extraction was. Seems like a good idea and maybe if you have a powered extractor (other than human powered that is) it would work better. I'm going back to uncapping with a knife.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,064 Posts
The title pretty much says it all. I have seen photos of a tool that looks like a mini paint roller with small spikes. One rolls it over capped honey and it pockets holes in the cap pings.
Is it efficient when extracting honey by centrifugal force?
YES it is. I got mine from MannLake and used it with great results. Takes only a few second per frame to puncture the cells and you can do that right over top of your extractor if you want. "I did".. The only thing that you need to know is you will need to watch it and clean it every now and then while using it. The cappings tend to build up between the cell punches. Running warm water over it will clean it quickly though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
I just used mine today for the first time and I'd have to say it's not that bad. As folks have already mentioned, it doesn have a tendency to load up. While it's easily cleared, I could tell how it would become an issue for anyone with a lot of uncapping to do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,166 Posts
You start to spend as much time unclogging it as you do uncapping. It may be fine for someone who has one hive. Anyone in the Bay Area that wants one can have mine. Come and get it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,627 Posts
When the frames are hot out of the hive the spiked roller worked very well. When the frames are on the coolish side the teeth gum up with cappings. Dipping in hot water fills the roller cavity with water which winds up sprinkling the next frame or two. With knife or capping scratcher you can do a bit of levelling of lumpy comb that the roller will not do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,090 Posts
You start to spend as much time unclogging it as you do uncapping. It may be fine for someone who has one hive. Anyone in the Bay Area that wants one can have mine. Come and get it.
You owe it to me for all I have done for you. I need it for my collection. PLEASE HAND DELIVER IT NEXT TIME YOU PASS BY.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top